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Even if it happens Obama will probably use an executive order to stop it. And we can expect the media to jump in and claim the government is now trying to sell murder weapons to the public.

If it did pass and was not stopped by the Democrats in congress or Obama I wonder what the price would be. CMP use to be a bargain. I bought a couple M1 rifles for $275.00 each (without wood) back in the 90s and back in the 60s from the DCM a M1911 for $20.00. I bet it would be more like $300.00 to $400.00 or more today.
 

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Based on the last ones I used while in the Army there will not be any prizes in that pile of pistols.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Based on the last ones I used while in the Army there will not be any prizes in that pile of pistols.
There may be a surprise or two, it would be nice to find out. However I would just be happy with a USGI model regardless of correctness, etc.
 

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There may be a surprise or two, it would be nice to find out. However I would just be happy with a USGI model regardless of correctness, etc.
IIRC - when I shot with the pistol team back in the 70's [don't say it!] every one [standard issue] I shot was all over the place AFA accuracy goes. But again - I'd like to put one in my safe at a decent price.

My father had a bring back from Korea or WWII - not sure which anymore, but my mom made him get rid of it after he and some others decided to target shoot in the back yard while the kids (i.e.meaning us - my broth and two sisters) were around. Not in danger, but moms are moms and she was sick of the war stuff I'm sure.
 

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Not with current anti gun trend spreading across the country. Besides, the CMP seems to have gotten very commercialized lately. Their prices are about what you see at most gun shows and their auction prices seem to be aimed at collectors only. I think the CMP has lost sight of its original intent.
 

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As I understand it the DCM was a tax payer supported agency. When Congress decided to allow the M1 Rifles in storage to be sold to the public they changed the DCM to the CMP and the CMP was supposed to support itself from funds taken from the sales of those rifles. Those rifles and ones returned from countries like Greece and 03 Springfields returned from the VFW are probably now nearly exhausted. What happens then? They will have to rely on funds from the sale of T shirts and targets with the CMP logo or some other thing. I agree they now seem to price the guns at about what they sell for at a gun show and you don't even get to examine them first. A while back I thought about getting another gun from the CMP and when I saw the new prices I couldn't believe it. I have not dealt with them since about 1995 and probably won't. I don't see the M1911A1 thing happening with Obama in the White House or even if some RINO republican gets in.
 

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Besides, the CMP seems to have gotten very commercialized lately. Their prices are about what you see at most gun shows and their auction prices seem to be aimed at collectors only. I think the CMP has lost sight of its original intent.
I agree, but I think there is a reason. More and more people are treating the CMP like some "honey hole" where they aren't really buying shooters anymore. They buy as many Garands as they can every year, and then barreled actions, and then receivers, and so on. If the CMP was really about its mission, promoting marksmanship, they would allow 1 rifle per person per lifetime, or perhaps 1 rifle per person every ten years. When people buy a dozen Garands, I don't think that their sole focus is shooting a single one to improve their shooting accuracy. Not saying a man can't have 12 Garands for shooting, as its obviously allowed, but that seems like drift to me. Not calling people hoarders, or resellers, or being insulting at all, but I think the CMP consumer has changed some.
 

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And then there were the guys who drove down to Anniston and bought whole truckloads of HXP ammo when it was first available, resulting in the 10 cans per year rule. I remember buying an M1 carbine from DCM back in about 1963 when you were allowed to buy ONE of each type of weapon, per lifetime. How the times have changed.

I've seen a lot of stories about the pistols, but when Orest was CEO of CMP he flatly stated that the CMP Congressional charter does not allow them to sell any handguns. Period. End of story. I don't think the current Congress will be very agreeable to changing this.
 

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And then there were the guys who drove down to Anniston and bought whole truckloads of HXP ammo when it was first available, resulting in the 10 cans per year rule. I remember buying an M1 carbine from DCM back in about 1963 when you were allowed to buy ONE of each type of weapon, per lifetime. How the times have changed.

I've seen a lot of stories about the pistols, but when Orest was CEO of CMP he flatly stated that the CMP Congressional charter does not allow them to sell any handguns. Period. End of story. I don't think the current Congress will be very agreeable to changing this.
Funny you should mention that as I just left the CMP web site a while ago and they state the same thing right up front. I believe they did not say they could not sell handguns but they did say the charter allows them to sell shoulder fired weapons or words to that effect (rifles). That would also have to change and I bet that congressman who proposed the legislation is not aware of it either.

When I bought my first M1 from CMP they only allowed you purchase one per year. I was unaware they had changed that rule. No wonder they have so few good M1s to sell the dealers and rich collectors have bought them up. Looks like them whats got the money gets. I don't think that is what congress had in mind when they set up the CMP.
 

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oh boy oh boy oh boyyyyyyyyyyyyyy :redspot::redspot::redspot::redspot::redspot::handclap::handclap::cashwallet::urtheman:
 

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IIRC - when I shot with the pistol team back in the 70's [don't say it!] every one [standard issue] I shot was all over the place AFA accuracy goes. But again - I'd like to put one in my safe at a decent price.

My father had a bring back from Korea or WWII - not sure which anymore, but my mom made him get rid of it after he and some others decided to target shoot in the back yard while the kids (i.e.meaning us - my broth and two sisters) were around. Not in danger, but moms are moms and she was sick of the war stuff I'm sure.
I have an original 1927 Hartford Colt (pre-Argentine) that still shoots minute-of man at 20 yards and it would be a huge bonus if the CMP's charter was rewritten to allow us regular people to buy one at a reasonable price.
 

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I read on the CMP forum yesterday that the bill was supposed to amend the CMP charter to allow the sale of pistols, subject to Presidential approval (Like that's going to happen) but the bill had that portion stripped out in the Senate. I doubt it will be reinstituted.
 

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The Kenyan Usurper hates an armed populace. However, he has done more to arm the populace since Thomas Jefferson, or my personal favorite.


“A principal source of errors and injustice are false ideas of utility. For example: that legislator has false ideas of utility who considers particular more than general conveniences, who had rather command the sentiments of mankind than excite them, and dares say to reason, `Be thou a slave'; who would sacrifice a thousand real advantages to the fear of an imaginary or trifling inconvenience; who would deprive men of the use of fire for fear of their being burnt, and of water for fear of their being drowned; and who knows of no means of preventing evil but by destroying it.

The laws of this nature are those which forbid to wear arms, disarming those only who are not disposed to commit the crime which the laws mean to prevent. Can it be supposed, that those who have the courage to violate the most sacred laws of humanity, and the most important of the code, will respect the less considerable and arbitrary injunctions, the violation of which is so easy, and of so little comparative importance? Does not the execution of this law deprive the subject of that personal liberty, so dear to mankind and to the wise legislator? and does it not subject the innocent to all the disagreeable circumstances that should only fall on the guilty? It certainly makes the situation of the assaulted worse, and of the assailants better, and rather encourages than prevents murder, as it requires less courage to attack unarmed than armed persons.”

Cesare Beccaria, Italian philosopher and criminologist writing in “On Crimes and Punishment” published in 1764.

This quotation is often wrongly attributed to Thomas Jefferson who greatly admired Beccaria.
 
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