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Very cool videos. I work as a Tool maker myself, neat to see how they did it a 100 years ago. Dangerous stuff with all those flat belts running everywhere.
 

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How about using a Vickers tripod to test the 1917? Ain't that interesting? Unlike the comments with the video, this video was most likely taken at a New England Westinghouse facility.
 

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I get a kick out of seeing these old movies with workers in factories with vests and ties. In the M1917 video they are even wearing suit coats almost like uniforms as they all look the same. Now days even the office workers would not be wearing suits in many places. I was always told not to as someone might get the idea that everybody should.
 

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16" rifle film...

Unless you were actually there on a 16" gun,this is the most detailed film on firing the 'rifle',as it's called. Very impressive....after watching the 1917 and the BAR films.
 

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PhD in Over-Engineering
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In Dolf's Vol I, there are still pictures from this same date. The same personnel and locations are seen as in the video, the manufacture of 1917 water cooled guns. The stills are credited to Roy Marcot, Historian, Remington Society of America. So, this would appear to be the Remington Arms Bridgeport Works, Bridgeport, CT. The stills peg the date as April 25, 1918. This is very early production, no guns delivered by any factory as yet. The men in uniform are likely the Ordnance Dept Assistant Inspectors of Ordnance, and one may be Capt. L.E. Biggs. His initials are on the early production guns from Remington, before Major E.E. Chapman took over that position. I have documented L.E.B. initials at serial 418xx range, and E.E.C. as early as 438xx. These are right in the middle of the first series of numbers assigned to Remington, 367xx to 467xx, so we have a 2000 gun range where the change in inspectors is known to have taken place, supposedly about August of 1918, according to Dolf.

Just having seen Mr.Maim's photos added, that is definitely Val A. Browning in the lower four pics. The top pic is a Mr. Best, at the Remington Arms Bridgeport Works, same gentleman seen on the video. I came darn close to getting to meet Val Browning in Ogden, about 1984. They told me he had attended our event two years earlier (if only I'd known!), and I tried to see if the staff could connect me to the right people to meet him. This was at the Performing Arts facility he funded, named after him still, but I didn't have the juice to pull off an introduction.
 

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In Dolf's Vol I, there are still pictures from this same date. The same personnel and locations are seen as in the video, the manufacture of 1917 water cooled guns. The stills are credited to Roy Marcot, Historian, Remington Society of America. So, this would appear to be the Remington Arms Bridgeport Works, Bridgeport, CT. The stills peg the date as April 25, 1918. This is very early production, no guns delivered by any factory as yet. The men in uniform are likely the Ordnance Dept Assistant Inspectors of Ordnance, and one may be Capt. L.E. Biggs. His initials are on the early production guns from Remington, before Major E.E. Chapman took over that position. I have documented L.E.B. initials at serial 418xx range, and E.E.C. as early as 438xx. These are right in the middle of the first series of numbers assigned to Remington, 367xx to 467xx, so we have a 2000 gun range where the change in inspectors is known to have taken place, supposedly about August of 1918, according to Dolf.

Just having seen Mr.Maim's photos added, that is definitely Val A. Browning in the lower four pics. The top pic is a Mr. Best, at the Remington Arms Bridgeport Works, same gentleman seen on the video. I came darn close to getting to meet Val Browning in Ogden, about 1984. They told me he had attended our event two years earlier (if only I'd known!), and I tried to see if the staff could connect me to the right people to meet him. This was at the Performing Arts facility he funded, named after him still, but I didn't have the juice to pull off an introduction.
Damn! I thought it was Val.

Post edited with extreme prejudice.
 

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PhD in Over-Engineering
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Damn! I thought it was Val.

Post edited with extreme prejudice.
You didn't need to do that! You only got the one wrong, and it's the info in Dolf's that references Mr. Best in a couple of photos. The other pics of Val are great stuff. I vote to put them back up!
 

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At Lucky#13's request :D I am putting back up my post wherein I erroneously identified the gentleman testing the 1917 at the end of the first video as Val Browning, when it is in fact Mr. Best of the Remington Arms at Bridgeport Works. I'll correctly credit the pictures as Mr. Best and Val Browning, they are somewhat fitting to the OP's video as Val is shown with both a 1917 and a BAR as represented in the videos in the OP.

Thanks Lucky#13. That indeed would have been an honor to have met Val before he passed.


Mr. Best of the Remington Arms at Bridgeport Works



Mr. Val A. Browning (front, adjusting rear sight)



Mr. Val A. Browning (front, firing 1917)



Mr. Val A. Browning



Mr. Val A. Browning
 
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