1919 A4 Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am new to the 1917 world, in fact I am not sure mine has all the pieces. It was kinda one of those deals.
What is the purpose for the threads on the the small end of the barrel, I have noticed some have them and some do not.
Thanks in advance for your time in helping me.
Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,280 Posts
Argentine I think, '28 model export guns? I have one that came with my '28 kit . I have several GI barrels and they do not have threads. Booster cups or BFA maybe?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,467 Posts
US Army Ordnance produced barrels will have the drawing number D35388-something for the revision number the Manufacturer ID such as RIA a "P" for proof testing and sometimes a few other letters that were likely some sort of production code. US made standard production barrels at least up to revision 19 did not have any threads on the muzzle end.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,066 Posts
I don't think a BFA or booster would have worked on the 1917 barrel as it was a strictly recoil operated design . Restricting the gas pressure in the barrel would not have accomplished anything. The BFA/booster would have to have been attached as a part of the barrel bearing not the barrel. The threads could have been for a flash hider or to attach a tool to adjust the headspace without having to take the whole weapon apart to do so. This was always a problem with the A4 or 1917 and was corrected with the A6 which could be adjusted with the weapon assembled by using a M6 wrench on the end of the barrel. However I believe this arrangement would have only worked in one direction depending on if it was a right or left hand thread. Then again it would depend on the design of the tool.
 

·
PhD in Over-Engineering
Joined
·
12,236 Posts
The 1928 Colt Argentine contract barrels, originally in 7.65mm Argentine (many converted to 30-06) are the ones with the threaded muzzle. While I've never seen the attachment that goes there, word I had was that it was some type of BFA, but I don't know how it worked. The USGI BFA does indeed replace the muzzle gland, as Armorer points out.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,066 Posts
As lucky13 said most definitely Argentine 1928 and keep in mind that the barrel notches are different than a 1917 or 1917A1 barrel. The Argentine and Colt 1928'sused a plunger in the barrel extension as opposed to the barrel lock spring used in the US military water cooled guns. I see a bunch of guys at the creek trying to pass off the 1928 barrels as 1917 or 1917A1 barrels and I try to tell them but they always argue?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,467 Posts
As lucky13 said most definitely Argentine 1928 and keep in mind that the barrel notches are different than a 1917 or 1917A1 barrel. The Argentine and Colt 1928'sused a plunger in the barrel extension as opposed to the barrel lock spring used in the US military water cooled guns. I see a bunch of guys at the creek trying to pass off the 1928 barrels as 1917 or 1917A1 barrels and I try to tell them but they always argue?
Next time take a drawing, hard to argue with that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
666 Posts
I have pictures somewhere of the BFA that was used with this type of barrel. The piece that went on the barrel was sort of funnel shaped to catch gases to aid in pushing the barrel to the rear. The rest of the adapter had a few pieces to it and it was ajustable for the gas pressure. The one i looked at was bought from ohio ordnance years ago. I will look for my pics tonight. This setup worked well with blanks.
 

·
Watercooled Addict
Joined
·
2,109 Posts
here is a 28 colt bfa in the center of the chest. It has a cup that screws onto the barrel (similar to a vickers). The body screws onto the standard muzzle gland in place of the flash hider. You cant see the cup in the pic as its simply loose inside the bfa at the moment.,
 

·
Watercooled Addict
Joined
·
2,109 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Thanks Guys

Thanks for all the info, I still have a lot to learn and I appreciate the members sharing their years of hard earned and often expensively gained information with myself and others.

Thanks Again
Dan
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,467 Posts
I would like to add a disclaimer to my earlier post. IF you had a WWI M1917 barrel or one produced before 1931 when the drawings changed to letter prefix there wouldn't be the D series drawing number/ makers ID/ P proof and would likely have square cut (.157 long) notches for the barrel locking spring. It appears that the notches became scalloped about July 1941 by revision 7.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Update

With the help of the guys on this forum, I figured out my threaded 1917 barrel was actually a 1928 Argentine barrel, not nearly as mysterious as a threaded 1917 barrel.
Thanks Again
Dan
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top