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Discussion Starter #1
Questions...Anyone ever swap brass data plates on the tripod leg? Rivet source for bronze/brass rivets? Looks more and more complicated the longer I stare at it:help: I'm guessing the metal bandsaw, welder, and a length of solid round stock to buck the rivets? Is the tripod foot pad a slip fitting with weld? Source for spare rear leg?
 

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PhD in Over-Engineering
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I think the correct size for the data plate rivets is .250 dia and length is 2" if I recall. Russ may remember, as we have been over this. I've drilled a couple out, but not reinstalled one yet. McMaster Carr has the right size, I think, brass rivets.

E-mail incoming on leg drawing.
 

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Porter Lucky13 is right they are 1/4"x2" and McMaster Carr has the brass rivets for them. I have seen brass data plates with both brass and steel rivets before but the few I restored I used brass on brass and steel on steel and they are not that bad to do but an extra set of hands does make it go easier. Last I knew the legs are still out there but if you get in a bind call me and I can help you out. Russ
 

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i just redid a couple data plates on the 1917a1 legs McMaster Carr has the right size brass rivets as lucky said but i had to re cut the rivet head to a 60 degree angle to fit the plates i had used a piece of rosewood to buck them up so not to ruin the data plate worked well pm me if you need any help
 

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Okay I see now:thinker: I have many coats of paint on the leg of my 1917a1 pod so it obscured the rivet head opposite side the plate so I figured open tripod leg surgery was going to be needed. Good thing I asked! :rofl: I ordered the rivets, and a leg from numrich so I should be good to go.

Any leather strap leads? I have some vintage USGI straps that would work but rather get the proper cut. Might be able to trade a base of an ashtray for it, LOL!
 

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Okay I see now:thinker: I have many coats of paint on the leg of my 1917a1 pod so it obscured the rivet head opposite side the plate so I figured open tripod leg surgery was going to be needed. Good thing I asked! :rofl: I ordered the rivets, and a leg from numrich so I should be good to go.

Any leather strap leads? I have some vintage USGI straps that would work but rather get the proper cut. Might be able to trade a base of an ashtray for it, LOL!
I have the specks for the leather strap on a word document but I can't attach it here. So here are some dimensions taken from an actual GI strap that I used to make a new belt for my tripod.

Overall Length: 23 inches
Width: one inch
Portion folded over to attach the buckle: 2 inches (allow 1/2 inch for fold).
Holes for adjustment start 2-1/2 inches from the tip and are spaced 3/4 inch center to center.
Number of adjustment holes: 9
A single hole is provided for the belt to be engaged by the stud in the plate 16-1/2 inches from the tip.
A leather keeper (loop) of approximately 3 inches in length and 1/2 inch wide is attached between the rivets that holds the buckle (sometimes stitching was used instead of rivets).
The ends of the keeper are stitched together but not overlapped. The leather for the keeper should be thinner than the belt.
The buckle is the roller type designed for a one inch belt. I have some of these that were originally used for the strap of the WWII EE8 field phone if you need one (or more)

I have made a couple of belts and probably have a spare if interested.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I have the specks for the leather strap on a word document but I can't attach it here. So here are some dimensions taken from an actual GI strap that I used to make a new belt for my tripod.

Overall Length: 23 inches
Width: one inch
Portion folded over to attach the buckle: 2 inches (allow 1/2 inch for fold).
Holes for adjustment start 2-1/2 inches from the tip and are spaced 3/4 inch center to center.
Number of adjustment holes: 9
A single hole is provided for the belt to be engaged by the stud in the plate 16-1/2 inches from the tip.
A leather keeper (loop) of approximately 3 inches in length and 1/2 inch wide is attached between the rivets that holds the buckle (sometimes stitching was used instead of rivets).
The ends of the keeper are stitched together but not overlapped. The leather for the keeper should be thinner than the belt.
The buckle is the roller type designed for a one inch belt. I have some of these that were originally used for the strap of the WWII EE8 field phone if you need one (or more)

I have made a couple of belts and probably have a spare if interested.
That's some good info, thanks! The belts I have are almost identical except slightly thinner than what is on mine.
 

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So where is everyone getting the data plate?
Epay, gunjoker or gun shows just lots of hunting but keep in mind some guys are just restoring the ones they have that don't have the leather strap and the proper way to do it is to remove the data plate and re rivet it.
 

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Just a follow up on Toolmans post, the actual data plates have a nub on the backside that keeps the leg strap in place once the data plate is rivetted on. To replace it is necessary to pull the plate. The later style McEvoys 1944/45 used a metal loop welded to the leg and do not have that retention nub. It is common for the layers of paint to fill in and hide the light stampings they made in those metal loops at the top edge of it. If you have that style it is worth putting a little zip strip on that area to see what is there.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Just a follow up on Toolmans post, the actual data plates have a nub on the backside that keeps the leg strap in place once the data plate is rivetted on. To replace it is necessary to pull the plate. The later style McEvoys 1944/45 used a metal loop welded to the leg and do not have that retention nub. It is common for the layers of paint to fill in and hide the light stampings they made in those metal loops at the top edge of it. If you have that style it is worth putting a little zip strip on that area to see what is there.
The spare leg showed up today. My plate has the nub, leg just has holes thru it.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I've been meaning to ask, when did the revision occur for shortening the rear leg to ww2 spec? Or, would a tripod with ww1 socket w/ capped hump, ww1 data plate, original length rear leg, and cradle with gas bottle knobs be legit?
 
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