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Discussion Starter #1
Gents, I am the new proud owner of a 1917A1 tripod that i got last week. I'm still trying to figure a few things out (like how high I should set it up and why the gross traverse lock is at the front of the tripod) she's a beauty but I have two pressing questions.

1) The rear leg is really hard to rotate. It seems like someone squeezed the yoke together but now the teeth don't separate enough in the fully loose position and I have to force the leg, not good on the teeth, because there is no play. The problem is I can't figure out how to take the tensioner apart. Suggestions?

This picture shows the tensioner in the fully loose position. Note the teeth.






2) Simple question: what is this tool for?

 

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It looks pinched in at the yoke like you said. A lot of pods have that problem and some have problems of just the teeth don't line up well and some I've seen seemed perfectly lined up and square and tighten/tension nice but it would take very little pressure to loosen the tensioner by hand as if weak; a very serious problem. The first time your gun falls over you will baptize the mallet and check it so often. So I've wondered since most of these pods saw some field use, was it an old soldier trick to slightly pinch the rear yoke to create more " V " to create even more possible tension once tampered down to prevent a fall over? I would gather many were pinched just a little too far maybe like yours and others I've seen.
I hope you don't have to remove the rear leg to spread it correctly but it looks like there isn't much over travel you have to play with. Three metal wedges and a hammer, or a Hi-Jack bar, two bar stock and some chain and hardware. Or take it to a garage with a press and let them rig something up who will probably have some scrape stock for rigging anyway.

If you have to drill out the pin head at the tensioner nut and drive out. Take apart and then spread the yoke. Test fit, use a C clamp to get it started if you need to and make a new pin, heat it and rivet back. Thats why I hope you have success without removing it first. And why I spend a fair amount of time going over a mount before I'd buy one in person but few chances of that these days.

As far as your second question I have to laugh I've wondered the same 1917a1 tripod tool. I wondered if its a wing nut tool for the leg extension or for clamps to the gun cart. Hopefully our curiosity will be gifted by more knowledgable folks.
 

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No clue on the tool & I own one.

Sadly I have not yet found a Tripod.

As far as fixing the "pinch"

I would use a Bolt..say 1/2" dia x 2" or less. Whatever length fits with room too spare.

Go to ACE and get a "tall" nut to fit bolt.

Insert in the pinched area and after locking the leg tightish,perhaps barely snug too loose.

Proceed to "loosen" bolt and Nut...carefully...this should/will spread the affected area.

Stick a large washer under head of bolt & under nut to prevent scaring of leg.

Looks like the Left side has a bit of a "bow" in it.

in efect. it will be similar to this tool.

$_1.JPG
header spreader ^^^^
 

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It's a M5 combination wrench.This wrench is used on the elevating mechanism of the cal 30 Tripod mount M1917A1 The hexegonal end is used to remove and replace the elevating sleeve bushing nut, the spanner end is used to remove and replace the elevating screw sleeve nut. From TM 9-1205 7Aug 1944.
 

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Thanks cobb that one was driving me crazy. Got it.

Yes much cheaper if it works.
In the shower this morning I was thinking a 5/8 in carriage bolt against a thick washer and use a rod coupling. First get a cup shape grinding mandrel, chuck it in your drill and put a bevel on one end of the rod coupling. Hardware stores have grinding mandrels in lots of sizes. Size it to fit like a dome in the end of a thick washer. A 5/8 Rod coupling uses a 3/4 wrench. If you go the 1/2 route, a 5/8 wrench.

That should spread but not gouge the yoke. Watch out if it slips under that kind of tension. I would put a face shield on.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
What exactly is holding the tensioner together? I see what appears to be a cross pin on the right side between the sliding handle and tripod itself. Is that holding that handle together?

Has anyone taken one of these apart?


I like your suggestions to create a device to push the yoke apart without disassembling the tripod leg but I can't really imagine that I'm going to be able to get enough pressure in that small of an area, pushing outwards, to create enough force to bend that steel.
 

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What exactly is holding the tensioner together? I see what appears to be a cross pin on the right side between the sliding handle and tripod itself. Is that holding that handle together?

Has anyone taken one of these apart?


I like your suggestions to create a device to push the yoke apart without disassembling the tripod leg but I can't really imagine that I'm going to be able to get enough pressure in that small of an area, pushing outwards, to create enough force to bend that steel.
I hope I understand this right, you want to expand the section of the leg yoke that is pinched at the same time realigning the teeth of the yoke so they are parellel to each other. If so, it seems a 1919 wedge type bucking bar could be fit in the pinched area to spread it and at the same time use a heavy c clamp to bring the teeth back in alignment. I hope this helps.

Junking
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I hope I understand this right, you want to expand the section of the leg yoke that is pinched at the same time realigning the teeth of the yoke so they are parellel to each other. If so, it seems a 1919 wedge type bucking bar could be fit in the pinched area to spread it and at the same time use a heavy c clamp to bring the teeth back in alignment. I hope this helps.

Junking
You are correct Junking. I want to expand the yoke and realign the teeth sections which are currently not parallel. A bucking bar or a wedge of some sort is actually a really good idea. That is something I could put into a press... thanks for the suggestion. Time to go locate some tool steel scrap triangles at the local metals outlet. :)
 

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You are correct Junking. I want to expand the yoke and realign the teeth sections which are currently not parallel. A bucking bar or a wedge of some sort is actually a really good idea. That is something I could put into a press... thanks for the suggestion. Time to go locate some tool steel scrap triangles at the local metals outlet. :)
The wedge bucking bars that use to be sold by members of this forum use an all thread and nut to pull the two halves of the wedges together to expand. It works great for this type of thing.

Junking
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Soooo... I got another 1917a1 tripod. Guess what? The stinking rear leg fork is pinched on this one too! Grrrrr... :mad:

 

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Discussion Starter #11
Has anybody here disassembled one of these legs? It appears that all I would need to do would be to drill out the two blind(ish) pins in the handle and it'll just unscrew.

Can anyone who has replaced a leg or restored one of these tripods please let me know?
 

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You can drive the pin out then the tensioner unscrews.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
You can drive the pin out then the tensioner unscrews.
By "drive the pin out" you mean that you can drill the pins out correct? They don't pass all the way through the tensioner handle so I don't think that there is any way to drive them out that I can see. Or am I missing something?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
You can drive the pin out then the tensioner unscrews.
Nope , drive out . It is one pin in an off center hole .
Chris
Holy cow. I have looked at that handle 100 times and never noticed that that is a single off-center pin. You guys are brilliant! :D

Glad I posted. I'll report back after I get one apart and put back together.
 

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I still have not painted my tripod head after stripping it so if you ever see a pic of my tripod base and the tensioner you will see the pin extending out the hole (with a wicked bend to it). Until I get around to paiting it a correct WW2 OD I didnt want to reset that pin.
 

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Soooo... I got another 1917a1 tripod. Guess what? The stinking rear leg fork is pinched on this one too! Grrrrr... :mad:
You have two of them now?

That's it. I'm voting for Bernie Sanders.

'cause if you have two and I have none, Bernie will make it so we have one.

Kinda rimes. :rofl:

Good luck with the disassembly. Never took one apart but pins, especially odd or hard-to-replace jobbies, have little percussion fired rocket motors in them. One solid whack and they launch, never to be seen again. An old pillowcase, cleverly placed or taped, makes for a good catcher. Advice I picked up from a guy who used it to take Garand bolts apart.
 

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I have a few well placed rocket propelled pins and springs located around my shop. Dang thing is they are so well placed I can't find them.
lol:rofl:
Steamer
 

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Steamer just wait till you rocket the G3 rear sight detent spring across the room. Small and it doesnt make a noise when it lands somewhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I still have not painted my tripod head after stripping it so if you ever see a pic of my tripod base and the tensioner you will see the pin extending out the hole (with a wicked bend to it). Until I get around to paiting it a correct WW2 OD I didnt want to reset that pin.
I totally get it. I was thinking about refinishing mine too.

Did you grind one of the two "heads" down and just use a driving punch? One of my tripods the rod ends are nearly flush, the other they are rounded like a rivet.
 
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