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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I understand there is potentially an issue using .308 in these old guns chambered for 7.62 NATO. For those who don't reload, do you feed your 1919 with either, only one or the other? Any negative outcomes with using .308? It's a lot more available, commercially. Practically speaking, does it make a difference?

Thanks,
2KYards
 

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Nope and nope. Just reload to USGI specs - especially OACL - and use 147 grain FMJ projectiles. Life will go on just swimmingly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Just to clarify - I don't yet reload. Does anyone run their 1919s with .308 Win? Any problems? Or does silence from the board members mean this is an absurd thing to even think of doing....
 

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Firearms chambered specifically for 7.62 NATO normally have no issues firing the commercial .308 cartridge. The one item you really need to be aware of and check before buying is the OAL of the cartridge. Many .308 rounds have an OAL that may not function properly in the 1919 due to the feedway spacing and how it extracts rounds from the belt/links. As long as the OAL is correct it should function well. Another issue I have heard board members discussing is the type of projectile, specifically running soft nose bullets in the 1919 can cause feeding problems to arise.
 

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OK, I'm a bit Amused here and I'm also had a long day and feeling no Pain and just haveing FUN!!! If you go by 2000Yards and don't yet reload, what am I missing. LOL!!!! And as I mentioned, I'm just haveing Fun!!! I started at 100yds, shot at 600yds, and WISH I could have shot at 1000yds, and have reloaded for all of them before my eyes give out...Again, just haveing Fun....Lou
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ohioblacksheep - no worries at all. As to why I don't yet reload, one thing at a time, one thing at a time!

As to my handle of 2000Yards, well, a man's gotta have goals, and while I've never shot to 2000 yards, every time I sign an email it reminds me of a goal.

2KYards
 

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Lou, This morning I could use a little of what you have..."and feeling no Pain and just haveing FUN!!!"

I like that goal :D

Keep reaching for your goal.

And the COAL should be ???

Steamer
 

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With correct length ammo in a 1919, the extractor claw drops over and into the gap in the case between the rim and body proper.

If it's a tiny bit short, that claw cannot reach that gap and ultimately ends up shoving the case farther forward just out of reach.

The soft, lead tips get mashed and makes the cartridge just that much shorter exacerbating the problem.
No help at all.
 

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Goals are Good!!! Had a few over the years..One of the Newer ones is to learn to Laugh at Yourself once and a while..At times it helps bring your mind out of Dark Places..:lol: The other one I liked and worked on for quite a spell.. Make guns and ammo put as many rds as possible, in a spot as small as possible, from as far away as possible, with as many firearms as possible..:) There are some folks out there that seem to think I've done Ok on that one..:) Reloading helps a LOT with that.... Have Fun!!!!
 

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Now here's a challenge for one of our enterprising machinist types; Come up with a front cartridge guide/spacer that uses a leaf spring in it's face to force the cartridge to the rear. This is exactly what Vickers 8mm and 30.06 feed blocks use. A sight variation in cartridge length is irreverent as the base is always pushed back and presented correctly to the extractor. Back in the day, I suggested the same approach be used with the LM7 and Razorback belt fed .22lr upper receivers. But, my suggestion fell on deaf ears. To my uneducated eye, a pusher leaf spring approach appears to be a relative simple and elegant solution to the real world issue of cartridge length variations.

 

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Now here's a challenge for one of our enterprising machinist types; Come up with a front cartridge guide/spacer that uses a leaf spring in it's face to force the cartridge to the rear
Huh, I have a cartridge stop like that for blanks. Not sure what it was originally for, but it fits my 1919 rather well.
 

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Huh, I have a cartridge stop like that for blanks. Not sure what it was originally for, but it fits my 1919 rather well.
Maybe I'm not nuts after all. If the leaf spring technique works in a Vickers, it should work in a Browning too. I must be missing something or just too ignorant to see an obvious problem. If anybody knows why this will not work, please elucidate me.
 

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The solution was developed decades ago in the form of the 30-06 short round stop . A fork like device that slips over the feeding case at the neck / shoulder and 1) forces it back into proper position and 2) holds the front end steady as the round is pulled out . Build that into your front spacer design and it will solve your problems .
Chris
 

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Now here's a challenge for one of our enterprising machinist types; Come up with a front cartridge guide/spacer that uses a leaf spring in it's face to force the cartridge to the rear. This is exactly what Vickers 8mm and 30.06 feed blocks use. A sight variation in cartridge length is irreverent as the base is always pushed back and presented correctly to the extractor. Back in the day, I suggested the same approach be used with the LM7 and Razorback belt fed .22lr upper receivers. But, my suggestion fell on deaf ears. To my uneducated eye, a pusher leaf spring approach appears to be a relative simple and elegant solution to the real world issue of cartridge length variations.

MG34_Dan--

The Canadians did that on their C1/C5A1 version of the M1919A4 with the front cartridge guide. Unfortunately, the part is only unique to the C1/C5A1 Left Feedway Bracket and will not fit the normal .30-06 M1919A4 left feedway bracket. I have attached a picture for your reference. one of these days I will have to run a box or two of Federal 150gr FMJ .308 Winchester through my gun to see if the tension spring works on short cartridges.

--fjruple

 

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Hey, that's my blank adapter!! So, it's off a Canadian gun 'eh? Neat! I'll have to try it with live rounds and see how it feeds.
 

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MG34_Dan--
The Canadians did that on their C1/C5A1 version of the M1919A4 with the front cartridge guide. Unfortunately, the part is only unique to the C1/C5A1 Left Feedway Bracket and will not fit the normal .30-06 M1919A4 left feedway bracket. I have attached a picture for your reference. one of these days I will have to run a box or two of Federal 150gr FMJ .308 Winchester through my gun to see if the tension spring works on short cartridges.
--fjruple
Here's what it looks like when mirrored. Now, this cartridge guide looks like it will work just fine in a 1919/1917:

 

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The bit that attaches to the belt holding pawl bracket is In the wrong spot. Mine had to be adjusted a bit to make it fit a 1919a4 (izzi)
 
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