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I happened across this information when I was searching for FN38's and thought I would one day have one.

Hibernation and Estivation
Hedgehogs hibernate in the wild when the temperature becomes too cold.
Hedgehogs in captivity also can go into periods of hibernation, which is very dangerous for your pet.
Hedgehogs in the wild may go into a dormant period of activity called estivation when the weather is too hot and dry in the summer. Captive bred hedgehogs should not go through estivation.
In the wild, hedgehogs live from their fat reserves during hibernation and estivation.
Hedgehogs living in captivity should be kept in a controlled environment to prevent hibernation or estivation.
Our Hibernation and Estivation guide goes into more detail about how to notice signs of hibernation and what to do.
Nocturnal
Hedgehogs are primarily nocturnal in nature.
Their senses are adapted to work best at night (www.hedgies.com).
Some hedgehogs may exhibit crepuscular activity, meaning they are active in early morning and early evening.
You may think your hedgehog sleeps all the time, but most likely it is active when you are not!
Baby hedgehogs sleep quite a bit, and they have a tendency to sleep more after the stress and unusual activity of going to a new home.
Hedgehogs may be gradually become acclimated to daytime activity through routine handling and feeding earlier in the day.
Burrowing
Hedgehogs sleep during the day in any dark place they can find.
In the wild, they may hide in vacated burrows from other animals, under rocks, or in thick vegetation, but they typically dig a shallow burrow of their own under some form of cover.
They enter and exit their burrows headfirst so the burrows or hiding places must be large enough for the hedgehog to turn around.
In captivity, hedgehogs still enjoy burrowing and if a hedgehog escapes it will hide in any dark quiet place it can find.
Ideally, the hedgehog’s cage is large enough to provide an igloo or other object in which they can hide. This not only provides hedgehogs with environmental enrichment but with a better sense of security as well.
 

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I happened across this information when I was searching for FN38's and thought I would one day have one.

Hibernation and Estivation
Hedgehogs hibernate in the wild when the temperature becomes too cold.
Hedgehogs in captivity also can go into periods of hibernation, which is very dangerous for your pet.
Hedgehogs in the wild may go into a dormant period of activity called estivation when the weather is too hot and dry in the summer. Captive bred hedgehogs should not go through estivation.
In the wild, hedgehogs live from their fat reserves during hibernation and estivation.
Hedgehogs living in captivity should be kept in a controlled environment to prevent hibernation or estivation.
Our Hibernation and Estivation guide goes into more detail about how to notice signs of hibernation and what to do.
Nocturnal
Hedgehogs are primarily nocturnal in nature.
Their senses are adapted to work best at night (www.hedgies.com).
Some hedgehogs may exhibit crepuscular activity, meaning they are active in early morning and early evening.
You may think your hedgehog sleeps all the time, but most likely it is active when you are not!
Baby hedgehogs sleep quite a bit, and they have a tendency to sleep more after the stress and unusual activity of going to a new home.
Hedgehogs may be gradually become acclimated to daytime activity through routine handling and feeding earlier in the day.
Burrowing
Hedgehogs sleep during the day in any dark place they can find.
In the wild, they may hide in vacated burrows from other animals, under rocks, or in thick vegetation, but they typically dig a shallow burrow of their own under some form of cover.
They enter and exit their burrows headfirst so the burrows or hiding places must be large enough for the hedgehog to turn around.
In captivity, hedgehogs still enjoy burrowing and if a hedgehog escapes it will hide in any dark quiet place it can find.
Ideally, the hedgehog’s cage is large enough to provide an igloo or other object in which they can hide. This not only provides hedgehogs with environmental enrichment but with a better sense of security as well.

Rusty - you must have been reading this post: http://1919a4.com/showthread.php?51773-Hedgehog-Up-date

I have one but it is now in the Hedgehog's hole - apparently while I was sleeping.
 
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