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I keep a reasonably small quantity of ammo in my basement, but it is a finished living area and bedroom. I am running out of room to keep things so I was considering starting to store the ammo in a detached garage.
The garage gets cold in the winter and hot in the summer (not hot enough to catch anything on fire but Hot) and is not humidity controlled.
Are there any major concerns with storing ammo in this type of environment.
I figured the places the ammo had been previously stored was definitely not a perfect environment so it probably wasn't a big problem.
Any opinions on this?
 

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I wouldn't do it unless it was ammo I planned on shooting in the immediate future (next 12 months).


Here's a little info that may help you make up your mind. I keep a pistol in my glove box and I live in Texas. I've been doing this for many years. It regularly gets over 100F for many weeks at a time during the summer. My car sits in the parking lot all day at my job and likely gets to 150F+ inside the car for 8 hours a day. I remove that gun about once a year and change the ammo. It's a Beretta 92 9mm w/ 3 mags (45 rounds total). I always specially mark that ammo and take it to the range to see if it was affected. In 15 years of doing this, I have only have one failure in the ammo that came out of that gun. It was a Winchester 9mm Silvertip round and it was a very weak round that did not cycle the slide, and did not even eject the case from the chamber.

So....my thinking is I know 12 months of extreme temps won't really hurt the ammo to any significant degree. So I'd feel comfortable with storing ammo for 12 months in the garage, if I was going to shoot it up by then.
 

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Years ago I worked for the US Army Natick Labs. There was a standard protocol for torture testing packaged food, uniforms and equipment. (We tested no ammo). The conditions were 100, 80, and 50 degrees F at 95%, 50% and 30% relative humidity. Canned peaches at 100 degrees and high humidity looked brown after six months. I took interest in this since after testing the stuff got dumped and I was a bachelor with two roommates. Since the stuff was of no more use, I could take it home. I had the benefit of test data so I avoided the high temp stuff.

Texas temperatures are extreme but in any state south of the Mason-Dixon line, hotbox garage temps can spike into powder degradation range. Keeping ammo in a basement is a good choice. Can you throw away stuff like furniture to make space??

Come to think of it I have a few thousand rounds of 60 year old 8mm Yugo out in the garage in cans. I's better start belting the stuff and use it.

 
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