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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
To those that own the crank fire setup how does it make sure the gun is at full lock up? On my 1919 the striker will drop when the bolt is backed of .010 +-. I would assume that this would be like firing with improper head space (if you tripped the trigger at just the right time). Any input?
 

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I have an Emory crank, and it does not make sure your gun is in battery. What you are refering to, is called timing. Timing is set with at headspace and timing gauge. Timing is adjusted with the screw above your trigger. This is the same screw that holds your trigger return spring. This is why it has a nut on it for a stop. Anyone feel free to speak up if I have made any errors. I hope this helps.
 

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all the crank does is trip the trigger...

just like you pulling it with your finger.

the timing is not changed by your crank, so if it wasnt headspaced correctly it still wont be... and if it was it still is.
 

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If a 1919 semi-auto is properly and safely setup, the trigger/sear engagement will be adjusted to where the gun cannot fire out of battery. Basically you can take varying size drill bits and place them between the barrel extension and trunnion to see the point where the trigger engages the sear and will release the firing pin when you pull the trigger (properly adjust head-space first before checking timing). If the trigger will release the firing pin when the space is larger than .120 inch (min .030) between the barrel extension and trunnion, then the gun can fire out of battery and would be dangerous if you were ever to pull the trigger when the bolt is traveling forward prior to when the bolt is in the last .120 inch of travel. From what I've seen, many 1919 semi manufacturers omit to make sure that their guns are timed properly in this regard. I suspect this is the cause of many of the out-of-battery explosions that sometimes are reported on this board.


If the gun is capable of firing out of battery, I would think that a crank fire mechanism would greatly increase the odds of this happening due to the fact it is able to pull the trigger much faster than normal when just using your finger. While not guaranteeing complete safety if the gun can fire out of battery, if just using your finger, you'll likely not be able to release the trigger and pull it again fast enough to trip the sear while the bolt is still in it's forward movement.
 

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:eek: Am I seeing what I think I am?!?!? Jmorris, did you automate bullet casting, and design a bullet feeder for a 650????? Absolutely pure genius. I humbly bow in your presence. I think the last guy that came up with something that impressed me this much was named Browning... I hope you make a billion off your ingenuity. You certainly deserve to. Of course, if you didn't do any of what I'm thinking you did, then I guess I'll just say nice hat. :D
 

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:eek: Am I seeing what I think I am?!?!? Jmorris, did you automate bullet casting, and design a bullet feeder for a 650????? Absolutely pure genius. I humbly bow in your presence. I think the last guy that came up with something that impressed me this much was named Browning... I hope you make a billion off your ingenuity. You certainly deserve to. Of course, if you didn't do any of what I'm thinking you did, then I guess I'll just say nice hat. :D
holy hell i didn't even look through the album!!!!!

jmorris, please post plans, builders kit anything. i want a bullet feeder for my 650!

rory
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for the complements but everything is really research over innovation. GSI international and KISS sell the bullet feeders in the photos I just built the collators/mounts (the bullet feeder feeders).

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=158478&highlight=magma+engineering is a link to more details on the bullet caster post #5 and #11.

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=68625&highlight=bullet+feeder is a link to the first bullet feeder I built. Post #7

http://www.brianenos.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=60933&hl=bullet+feeder A little more info on 650 and 1050 bullet feeders

http://www.brianenos.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=11364&st=0 is a link to more info on the brass sorter (the single most time saving device I’ve built to date).
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
On the end where the brass falls onto the rollers the gap is narrow. On the opposite end, before the 2” rollers end, they open to .525" just over .44mag OD. Because of the precision necessary you can’t just use a piece of pipe. For example to sort 38super (OD of .406) from 9mm (OD of .394) from 380 (OD of .374) you are only looking at a .032” change over 12” of travel. So if you had .016” run out on each roller all of the above cases would dump into the same bin (and you couldn’t call it a sorter). I used seamless 4130 chrome moly tubing for the rollers. The rollers counter rotate (clockwise for the drive roller and counter clockwise for the driven roller) so they don’t “grab” the cases; instead they “float” down until they have enough clearance to fall through. The incline was arbitrarily set so the cases flowed down in a quick but controlled manner. The speed of the hopper also has to be matched to the speed that brass travels down the rollers to prevent the cases from “stacking”. This is accomplished by the box below the gear reduced roller motor (AC); it is an adjustable (0-30v) dc power supply that runs the (very) gear reduced hopper motors (DC).
 
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