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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There are drawings...thanks to Gatekeeper (Jodi)....and such to use as a guide for making the parts for a 1917 cart. However...it's another thing altogether to amass enough parts,pieces,hardware and such to actually make a 1917 Machine Gun Cart.
Well...now I can profess...and show a few pic's...of actually putting 12-carts together...from scratch. This required the making of 12-axle-'A'-frame assemblies...with the spindle bent at exactly 1 1/2 degrees,a proper lunette eye and length and width to specs. Over 350# of old-style carriage bolts (5-lengths,4-sizes),square nuts with hump (3-sizes),flat washers (4-sizes),lock washers,screws and associated metal parts. Kept a local blacksmith busy all winter and he's still not finished making other parts for completion of these carts.
The pic's are of the basic cart frame assembly....the last one...#12. The ammo carriers,gun boxes,single-trees,chain hooks,etc. are still being made.
Next...I have to paint them and find at least 12-38" artillery wheels...it never ends.
 

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Well Len - certainly a work of art and love. I hope you have a big building - know I really had trouble storing mine, and decided to sell it. Those are really pretty neat, and the technology is pretty low-tech. Keep the photos coming !!
 

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And I thought I had obsessions!! Looking good Len, look forward to the updates

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
...a certain number...

Why..? Long story....but easy to tell. There were 26-carts in a 1917 Machine Gun Cart Co, that went to war in 1917....12-gun carts,12-ammo carts and 2-spare gun carts. A complete Co has not been seen or been in existence since about 1927-1929,as the US Army went mobile and became 'mechanized'. I already had 14-original carts and decided to build 12-more to make a complete Machine Gun Cart Co. that has not existed since that time.

Unlike the 6-years it took to get the 1918 Browning belt loaders in production...expensive to get parts cast,machined,etc.,I was able to fund the making of the axle's,'A' frame's and spindle's all at once. Same with the wood poles,cross poles and all the hardware.

Overall objective: A military historical perspective. Put together a complete US Army 1917 Machine Gun Cart Co.,put it on display and take old-style panaramic photo's....just like was done in WW1 and WW2 to show complete units. These were 3'-5' long and most are now in museums. Then I will attempt to assemble the original-style shipping crates and offer the carts to museums or for sale....just as they came from the International Harvester,Velie Car Co. and the St. Louis Car Co. from June 1917 to May 1919. Only 25K of these carts were in inventory in June 1919...over 50K were left in Europe and were either burned,destroyed in combat or given away as surplus after the war....just like we leave our military equipment everywhere since.

I am on a dedicated quest to preserve our military history from an era that has too few artifacts and no one left to tell the story. WW1 made the United States a world power,made everyone take notice of the way we fought and won. Germany and Japan did not take this lesson well and had to learn again in WW2.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
...right answer...

...mules...not horses...LOL. Not a problem...really. The carts were made to haul by hand...when the mule was lost in combat...or eaten. The 55" metal poles with a knuckle at the end was to have a wood cross-pole inserted creating a 'T" handle to move the cart. My 600' frontage will enable me to pose all the carts to look like they are on a gravel road in France...circa 1918...and lined up for inspection or prior to a fire mission.
 

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...mules...not horses...LOL. Not a problem...really. The carts were made to haul by hand...when the mule was lost in combat...or eaten. The 55" metal poles with a knuckle at the end was to have a wood cross-pole inserted creating a 'T" handle to move the cart. My 600' frontage will enable me to pose all the carts to look like they are on a gravel road in France...circa 1918...and lined up for inspection or prior to a fire mission.
Yes, mules not horses, don't I feel like an ass. No pun intended. :lol:
 
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