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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So my first kit arrived from KMP and I wanted to clean off the cosmoline to see what I had. I went to Costco and pick-up their $8.99 industrial bucket and some paint thinner at the hardware store.



Needed to get into the barrel shroud, so after a good soaking, I pulled off the booster then back into the thinner.



So next was to remove the shroud. It looks like the screw is staked.



Are they cold staked and need to be drilled out?

I also have an insert in the trunion with 5/8" trunion hole on the LSFP and pintal pad and 9/16" on the new RSFP trunion hole and USG pintal pad. Not a problem, just unexpected. I have already received a replacement sleeve to use after I press out the old one. Are there any more surprises on Izzy 1919A4's like a soldered shroud or other items with screws that are staked that I should know about?

Thanks,

DaveB
 

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PhD in Over-Engineering
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Dave, you are discovering all the joys of how mixed up these kits can be. To start with, that jacket screw is almost impossible to save intact. I start with a impact driver, and if that just rips the head away, out comes the drill. Either way those screws are generally toast. An off the shelf replacement is just a standard, 10-32 x 1/4" flat head. As to solder, sometimes yes, sometimes no. Only way to find out is to try and break it free. If it ain't moving, apply heat from a Mapp Gas torch. Sometimes just a little heat will let it move, and sometimes there is solder and you'll need to get it warm enough to melt. Helpful to have an extra pair of hands for that. I have a bench mounted vise to hold the trunnion, and a long piece of round stock through the jacket holes as a breaker bar. Even then, it's much easier to have someone holding the torch, if needed, so you can have both hands on the breaker bar. And then, sometimes, they just break free with light effort. Good luck!

On your pintle hole, the 5/8 hole is the most common on Izzy kits. You can keep your 9/16" hole on the RSP and shorten the bushing, unless you want both pintle pads to be symmetrical. In that case, you have to bore the RSP out. Or, you can get a new 9/16 pintle pad for the LSP and hide the bushing inside, between the pads. All kinds of options for you, and all will get the job done.

You may find other things staked, such as screws on the front sight assembly, etc. Most of that is easy to deal with. Oh, if your breech lock cam is not already removed, that can be a bugger. Usually staked inside and out. But they are usually already out in most kits. Let us know how else we can help!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks - I appreciate the help. I just looked at the breech lock and $#%& you're spot on...



Geez. I thought, no problem. Don't rebuild a transmission, instead, use the money to get a kit of parts, clean them up, hardest part is alignment then riveting. Little did I know. This really is no problem. It's like Ikea from Israel, less a few parts, maybe a few extra holes. I'm already getting the tooling and inducting my 12 year old daughter as my minion.

Thanks again,

DaveB
 

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Dave Jeff P. at Iron Creations has the jacket screws and I believe he may have the beech lock cam screws but Tom T. at KMP make those so I am sure he has the breech lock cam screws in stock. You will certainly get some file time in on these older izzy kits but it is worth it in the end knowing you did it yourself. Good luck and shout if you need help or have questions that is what we are here for. Russ
 

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Short answer is both but the izzies got carried away at times staking everything :rolleyes: I guess they liked their punches and hammers lol they have staked in pawl holding brackets, top cover pivots, bottom plates , top plates and the list goes on. Consider yourself lucky you only have a few [arts to deal with like that since it could have been much worse.
 

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Thanks - I appreciate the help. I just looked at the breech lock and $#%& you're spot on...



Geez. I thought, no problem. Don't rebuild a transmission, instead, use the money to get a kit of parts, clean them up, hardest part is alignment then riveting. Little did I know. This really is no problem. It's like Ikea from Israel, less a few parts, maybe a few extra holes. I'm already getting the tooling and inducting my 12 year old daughter as my minion.

Thanks again,

DaveB
You've got a cool project. It's even more fun when you get your kids involved. It makes for some great memory's. And it's a great feeling went the shoot the gun you have built. My son as been running the mill and the lathe making small parts since he turned 10. He is 15 now and wanting to learn to weld next. I have a few summer time gunsmithing projects lined up for us.

I am looking forward to seeing the progress. Keep up the good work and kudos for getting the lil miss involved. Keep it fun and she will remember this forever! And you will have a hard time doing projects by yourself. It's not a bad thing!
 

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Here's what you should consider: DO NOT stake the new screw., once you get the jacket (its NOT a SHROUD, only that fatass Carolyn McCarthy says that in a LI accent this idiot couldn't describe one and she is a US Representative) Once the jacket is off the trunnion clean the threads THOROUGHLY add a drop of Lockitie "remember the Brylcreame jingle "a little dab ulll do you" same for the screw. Don't get too hung up on what "they" used to do. Use modern tech.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
(its NOT a SHROUD, only that fatass Carolyn McCarthy says that in a LI accent this idiot couldn't describe one and she is a US Representative)
Funny - I referred to it as the shroud because the tutorial on this site calls it that....

http://1919a4.com/tutorials/images/110949.jpg

Anyway - got the screw out.





Then took a tire iron and got the Jacket off.



Then I got a 3/4 pipe and ground one edge to fit flush to the backside of the trunnion where the insert fits. Use the vice to press the insert flush with one side, then used a 5/8" bolt, which clears the trunnion hole but not the insert, and tapped it out the rest of the way.





Started the exterior dry fit after the cleaning. Nothing seems to be warped. Only minor fitting is needed.



Then ran into more staking, seriously...



Someone needed to tell whoever did this to step away from the punch.

As for the rebuild and setting the screws - yes, I plan to use a thread lock. I would prefer to replace the screws with hex heads (anything but slotted).

Anyway, good day plus got a 20 ton press on sale for $159.

DaveB
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
My son as been running the mill and the lathe making small parts since he turned 10. He is 15 now and wanting to learn to weld next. I have a few summer time gunsmithing projects lined up for us.
It is blessing to be able to have your kids interested in your hobbies and for us to be interested in theirs. Sounds like you two make a good team.

My daughter also wants to learn to TIG weld, but I told her to wait a few more years. She is 12, 5'6" and still growing into her legs - like watching a Great Dane puppy run (we do grow 'em tall in Texas).

DaveB
 

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DaveB,
She is old enough teach her to TIG other than the UV it is the most clean and quiet welding method but it requires concentration and coordination of both hands and the sooner she learns the better she will end up at it !!:D:D
I learned stick at 10 and at 16 certified nuke grade ASME TIG position 6G at Lincoln Electric no less . It has served me well for my entire life as both a surface and underwater welder in every welding process but submerged arc . It is only one of the 12 industrial "arts " i hold mastery of .:tongue:
 

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It is blessing to be able to have your kids interested in your hobbies and for us to be interested in theirs. Sounds like you two make a good team.

My daughter also wants to learn to TIG weld, but I told her to wait a few more years. She is 12, 5'6" and still growing into her legs - like watching a Great Dane puppy run (we do grow 'em tall in Texas).

DaveB
Get some scrap metal and let her tinker. I know a few gal welders and they do quite well! You can;t start them to young. I've got 3 girls and non are in to the mechanic part. my youngest loves to shoot and does quite well. My boy loves doing it all. Doing this with my kids means the most to me. Good memory they will tell there kids.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
As for my little welder - Stopped by the USS Alabama. Great battleship with some nice aircraft (F-15/16, F/A-18, SR-71) and submarine on display. My daughter loved it. Nice Father/Daughter day out. When we get back, we'll finish up the 1919A4. Time for her to sandblast parts. Happy Father's day to all.



DaveB
 

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Ive been to that place ,,, is the PBR still there catty corner to the SR71 ? that PBR they have is very cool, sub is cool too, ahh hell its all cool !
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Ive been to that place ,,, is the PBR still there catty corner to the SR71 ? that PBR they have is very cool, sub is cool too, ahh hell its all cool !
You are spot on.

Great little air museum. Don't recall the PBR near the SR71. After climbing all the stairs on the USS Alabama (kids had to go from the bottom to the top several times), getting into the air conditioned air museum was heaven. The other Dad with me is a mechanic for LM on the F-16's. I provide equipment for fighter aircraft, so the museum was a blast.

SR71:



BTW - When I lived in California, the traffic guy on the radio was Gary Powers.

Sub (my daughter had to push all the buttons):



If you get a change and are in Mobile, I would encourage anyone to stop by the USS Alabama for a few hours and take in everything the museums have to offer. It opens at 8:00AM. Seeing an WWII ice cream parlor in a battleship is worth the visit.

Dave
 

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BTW - When I lived in California, the traffic guy on the radio was Gary Powers.
My oh my, that was a while back. Francis Gary Powers flew the traffic helicopter for years, until that tragic day he went down with it. I remember that all too well. We were blessed to have him around, but it always struck me as ironic that he could survive the U-2 incident, build a successful career for years and then be gone in such a tragic way.
 

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dont mean to get off topic on the op, but the ice cream parlor on the USS TEXAS is very old style......Dave B that PBR was about 2 oclock from the nose of the SR71, man i hope they still have it. plan on going back there soon..last time i was a bit rushed, would like to make a day of it..
 
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