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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was wondering if anyone could tell me if this is a WWI or WWII vintage T&E (or whatever!). The big adjustment wheel looks to be painted (black) brass, and as you can see in the pictures, it is pretty rough on the edges. Some of the other smaller parts appear to be brass/bronzed as well (finer adjustment knob).
I can't make out all the drawing numbers, but here goes:
on the top: B1266469-4 (with also a conjoined AD)
on the top over on the side is: X1335, with a WHH underneath it

on the vertical cylinder: 40482, there's also a small flaming bomb on the side
on the vertical cylinder on the other side: B-295549, again with that AD as well
on the very bottom of the cylinder, there's a : L M C
IMG_6616.JPG IMG_6615.JPG IMG_6617.JPG

Thanks!
 

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I am not an expert on these, someone will chime in shortly I am sure. The drawing numbers present put it at the earliest mid 30s. I am sure Riverrats probably has the drawing number on a sheet that will narrow down the exact time frame. BUT the configuration of the pin, and the knob with the parrelel hashers (grip indentations, as well as the brass present would lead me to believe an earlier production WW2 T&E. Not sure if the AD is for Anniston Army Depot or a manufacturer. As I said this is an area I do not pretend to have expertise on.
 

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As with the 1918 belt loaders made before WW2,many of the parts were brass. After Feb-Mar 1942,many of the parts were re-spec'd to be made of cast iron or steel....as brass/copper was considered a 'war-critical' material. Therefore,all the belt loaders and T&E's that I've seen made after 1942 do not have any brass parts/pieces. I concur that the T&E you are asking about was definitly made before WW2. Believe the first T&E's made for the 1919 appeared in the late 20's or early 30's. Depends on when the M2 tripod was put into military service.....
 

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Well I don't have a lot of T&E stuff, but here goes. The only drawing I have dates this assembly with the parts described to August 1940 as the earliest.

There may be another earlier assembly drawing using these parts, but I dont have it. The M2 tripod drawings have an original date of 1934

The yoke should be marked B166489 or B166489A ( the alternate design part) sometimes the numbers are hard to read. The "-4" following the drawing number is revision 4 to the drawing/piece mark which "earliest possible" dates this part design to 10-07-41

AD symbol is likely a manufacturers symbol as this same mark appears on M1918A2 and M1919A6 late style bipod wing bolts. I don't know who AD is maybe someone out there can help us out. It might be the AB Dick Company who made mimeograph (duplicating) machines remember those?, but just a guess.

The sleeve should be marked B195549 the 40482 maybe some sort of manufacturer's marking for their internal use, LMC is likely Lamson Manufacturing, Saracuse, NY a WWII era maker of tripods, the X1335 may be a rebuild marking and WHH maybe the inspector especially if it appears to be hand stamped rather than moulded into the metal.

A few not so educated guesses along with some solid info.
 

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....the parrelel hashers .... lead me to believe an earlier production WW2 T&E.
I might be very wrong about this but it was my impression that the early "knobs" did not have the parrallel hashers and the post-WWII (Viet Nam era?) knobs were knurled.
 

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The elevation "knob" on this T&E is made from a lamination of identical stampings. In my business this type of fab work is done to ease production and make things cheaper/faster. The solid milled/engraved knobs would require more difficult machining and more fixturing. I would vote these type are either late WWII or 50's/60's. Also, the two Ive ever had like this both came with m60 extensions on them. J
 

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The elevation "knob" on this T&E is made from a lamination of identical stampings. In my business this type of fab work is done to ease production and make things cheaper/faster. The solid milled/engraved knobs would require more difficult machining and more fixturing. I would vote these type are either late WWII or 50's/60's. Also, the two Ive ever had like this both came with m60 extensions on them. J
I only have one drawing of the elevating handwheel B108211 REV 16 dated Oct 1944 it shows a solid piece of 1020 steelwith a knurled finish on the edge as the standard, however the drawing shows 3 alternate methods of manufacture
B108211A thru B108211C all of which have the same stock number in the SNL, not having those drawings I can't say if the one of these alternates is fabricated from a bunch of stampings riveted together like the one shown in the picture.. The September 1943 SNL lists all 4 handwheels so whatever the alternates look like they were around when this SNL was prepared.

This may explain why there are all the different styles out there. Ordnance considered them to be interchangable.
 

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In my travels I have spoken with several military depo repair guys. One gentleman spoke for a half hour about getting truck loads of T&E's,canniblizing them for useable/serviceable parts and throwing out the rest. He and a team of (6) GI's then rebuilt as many of the T&E's...30's and .50's....as they could with the stuff they had. They got pretty good at it....as most of us do with repetative work...and packaged up thousands of 'em to send back into the field. This was about the mid-to-late 70's....after Nam...and therein lies the story of many different parts being found on a lot of T&E's in use today. I've also bought several '30 cal ones from a buddy in Italy and most of them had brass wheels,rings and parts on 'em. They were war trophies gathered in Italy from battle fields during and after WW2.
 

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As you pointed out and according to that old commerical for somebody's chicken nuggets "parts is parts".

Virtual 100% parts interchangability lets you do just what those GI's did.

I'll see about getting those alternate parts drawings so we can have a looksee at the handwheels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the replies on this _ I appreciate the time you all have spent thinking about this. I was simply curious, since it was of very different construction than the other T&Es that I have (those I am pretty certain are later, since there's really no brass on them). One other point about the AD marking, is that is is actually cast into the metal, it's not stamped, so I would concur that it's probably a manufacturer's marking of some type.
Thanks!
 

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My bet is WWII, but not 100% sure. I hear that the chain attachment was deleted from the yoke post war, but I have no means to document that yet. The M2 tripod was developed in the thirties for the 1919A2 Cavalry gun, before the A4 was even on paper.
 
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