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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone, I ran across a deal I could not pass up the other day. A LGS I do part time work at had a GI carbine sitting in a corner and when I had asked about it I was told it was not safe to sell or shoot? Upon further inspection the gun was found to have had a rewelded receiver (not a professional job) and a barrel with a burgered up gas piston(more poor work) anyway I asked the boss what was going to be done with it and he said he did not know what he was goin to do with is as it was only good for parts......:D After a little back and forth I get the gun for $250, I already have a good stripped receiver sitting in the safe and has been keeping an eye out for a parts kit. Now I'm looking at sending the receiver and bolt off to Fulton Armory to get a "Barrel Assembly, M1 Carbine, Chrome Moly, Match Quality, FA by Criterion, with Type 3 Band" installed. At this point I should have a nice rifle that will last me for a verrrrry long time. I already have two other GI Carbines so I'm not worried about it being a 100% GI gun. So what does the majority think?

I also wanted to see if the old receiver and barrel could be used for something? Mabye a start for a display gun for someone? Is it worth anything?
 

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If you bfa the barrel, here is a scope of work:

1. buy several 3/8"X24 cup point set screws and anneal them to dull red. Set aside and let cool.

2. Using a size "Q" drill with a shoulder stop on it, drill out 5/8" of the rifling in the barrel. Also drill a hole in a block of scrap aluminum or steel at least 3/8" thick.

3. Chamfer the hole in the barrel just a bit to make tapping easier.

4. Using a 3/8"X24 tap(three flute HSS is good or four flute carbide) cut a thread and go slow. Use plenty of heavy oil and back out frequently, the steel is tough.
Check progress by installing a set screw until it is flush or slightly protruding.

5. Tap the scrap block and use it to hold your set screws when drilling the orifice holes. Drill from the cup side. When you break through, the bottom of the hex socket is
super crispy hard from the broaching process. 3/16" is the biggest you can drill, down to about .090. Any smaller and you just break drills. Make them in roughly .015
increments. 1/8" is good for Swansons GI carbine blanks.

6. Clean up and install. Carbines are just as much fun with blanks as they are with ball in my opinion. J
 

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I know a place you could sell it to and they would make a "rare" dummy gun out of it and charge 5X the amount VS what a live gun would cost in their weekend sales. . :D
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Interesting information everyone, thanks for sharing. I am still looking at my options and havent made any decisions yet but making it a blank firing gun sounds like a good idea. Then I could sleep an night knowing it was not converted back into a shooter again.

Slugcatcher, if you could P.M. the info on your sourse I would be greatful, If I sold it to someone who wanted to make it as a blank gun then I could even recoup some of my investment and keep the overhead low for this project.

Again thanks for sharing....
 
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