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Discussion Starter #1
Had an interesting range day.

Began in .308. The weapon ran perfectly until the last two belts. The bolt handle became hard to charge from it's forward-most position on the last belts, still ran good though. I just can't explain it. Cleaning parts now, maybe that will shed light on the awkward bolt charging.

Ended in 54R. This was my third time firing 54R, and I finally got it right.

1st Trip - Slow rate of fire and "light" primer strikes that would not set off 1/8 rounds.
Actions taken - Advised by Barrelxchange to reduce the front cartridge guide in front of the bolt to allow loading cartridges into the bolt without friction, and use more oil/grease.

2nd trip - Better rate of fire, but light primer strikes 1/10 rounds.
Actions taken - Bought and installed new firing pin springs from Richard Zapperoli at Custom Metal Works in Mesquite, Texas. Switched from swabbing Hoppes #9 oil to using an oiler can with flexible spout line full of 5W30, oiling the weapon continually. Reduced the front cartridge guide more towards the feed end.

3rd Trip - Optimal rate of fire, only had to charge the handle 3 times to advance/reload out of 650 rounds.
Actions Taken - Bought more new firing pin springs from Custom Metal Works. Saving money to get another barrel cut by Troy. Every round that had formerly not discharged on range trip #2 from "light primer strike" fed through my 1919 once I put in the new firing pin springs from Custom Metal Works... that spring made all the difference! Much better primer strikes as compared to the previous range trips.

Many thanks to Troy at Barrelxchange and Rich at Custom Metal Works for helping me shoot below $0.24 per round!!!!!!!
 

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Had an interesting range day.

Began in .308. The weapon ran perfectly until the last two belts. The bolt handle became hard to charge from it's forward-most position on the last belts, still ran good though. I just can't explain it. Cleaning parts now, maybe that will shed light on the awkward bolt charging.

Ended in 54R. This was my third time firing 54R, and I finally got it right.

1st Trip - Slow rate of fire and "light" primer strikes that would not set off 1/8 rounds.
Actions taken - Advised by Barrelxchange to reduce the front cartridge guide in front of the bolt to allow loading cartridges into the bolt without friction, and use more oil/grease.

2nd trip - Better rate of fire, but light primer strikes 1/10 rounds.
Actions taken - Bought and installed new firing pin springs from Richard Zapperoli at Custom Metal Works in Mesquite, Texas. Switched from swabbing Hoppes #9 oil to using an oiler can with flexible spout line full of 5W30, oiling the weapon continually. Reduced the front cartridge guide more towards the feed end.

3rd Trip - Optimal rate of fire, only had to charge the handle 3 times to advance/reload out of 650 rounds.
Actions Taken - Bought more new firing pin springs from Custom Metal Works. Saving money to get another barrel cut by Troy. Every round that had formerly not discharged on range trip #2 from "light primer strike" fed through my 1919 once I put in the new firing pin springs from Custom Metal Works... that spring made all the difference! Much better primer strikes as compared to the previous range trips.

Many thanks to Troy at Barrelxchange and Rich at Custom Metal Works for helping me shoot below $0.24 per round!!!!!!!
When you are having trouble pulling the charging handle to the rear because it is binding or hanging up at the beginning of it's travel, one thing to check is the front end of the barrel and the inside of the booster. The front bearing surface of the barrel has to slide freely back and forth in the booster and it's a fairly tight fit. Because the muzzle blast gets trapped in there the boosters get really caked with carbon and other fouling. If it gets tight enough to keep the barrel from sliding freely back and forth it can cause the hanging-up that you describe.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That makes sense!

Thanks Dink, that does make a bit of sense. I need to read the field manuals about installing the front bearing booster. Right before the bolt acted up, I did notice that the front of the booster came slightly loose since it was not staked properly to the lower part of the booster. I did a field repair and will check that out. As of right now, I'm just finishing up cleaning the barrels,54R parts (bolt,extension,lock frame) & main receiver since the 54R ammo is corrosive... I'll catch up on the .308 internals next week.

I do not yet own the socket to separate the booster bearing - maybe that is a must for ownership??? Do you have to buy a different socket for Izzy vs USGI or will one of the sockets do both types???

I also get some really large flames out of the bearing when in 54R... I wonder if I am steaking it in too loose??
 

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Thanks Dink, that does make a bit of sense. I need to read the field manuals about installing the front bearing booster. Right before the bolt acted up, I did notice that the front of the booster came slightly loose since it was not staked properly to the lower part of the booster. I did a field repair and will check that out. As of right now, I'm just finishing up cleaning the barrels,54R parts (bolt,extension,lock frame) & main receiver since the 54R ammo is corrosive... I'll catch up on the .308 internals next week.

I do not yet own the socket to separate the booster bearing - maybe that is a must for ownership??? Do you have to buy a different socket for Izzy vs USGI or will one of the sockets do both types???

I also get some really large flames out of the bearing when in 54R... I wonder if I am steaking it in too loose??
The booster is the biggest dirt-collector on the gun and is difficult to clean, but the longer you let it go, the worse the job is. When you are cleaning your barrels, look for signs of rubbing or scraping on the outside of the front bearing surface and clean appropriately. Inside the booster is awkward to get at, but a lot of people chuck a stiff steel brush into a pistol drill and go at it with that. If you have a two-piece booster it's easier to clean, but as you discovered it's just another part to unscrew while you are firing. Get the booster wrench. As far as I know, it should handle Izzy and US parts the same. DON'T put lube inside the booster after it's cleaned, as you will quickly bake it into a mess that will just foul things worse. The back end of the Browning loves oil, but not the front end.
 

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appreciate the advice Dink. I've had the occasional binding of the charging handle as mentioned above but havent thought of the front end.

yep... after a day of 54R that crud is baked solid on the booster components. Up till now I just left it...screw it..too much trouble to remove the gunk...but I failed to appreciate how it could contribute to malfunction. Thanks.
 
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