1919 A4 Forums banner
1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,470 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
About six months ago I bought a rusty and completely frozen WWI Vickers mount from a fellow board member. Today I finished restoring it. When I purchased it, it was missing one stud and the spring retaining plate. It had medium pitting but overall was solid and not a relic.

I have to say that two people provided valuable assistance to me. One person was Mike Duke who unfroze the piston from the mount housing, a task which I wisely knew he could do far better than me. He also fabricated new studs for me along with a replacement spring retainer plate. I hope to eventually find an original one.

The second person was Richard Knight in England (not a member of this forum). This incredibly generous man mentored me on how to rebuild the mount providing me with answers on the original materials used and provided drawings of the parts I needed to fabricate.

Below are a couple of pictures of the mount as I purchased it:
Wood Line Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood

Personal protective equipment Helmet Auto part Art Fashion accessory

Composite material Cylinder Electric blue Bicycle part Metal


and as it exists today after restoration:
Camera accessory Metal Circle Natural material Fashion accessory

Strap Collar Fashion accessory Metal Font

Brown Rectangle Wood Bag Material property
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
677 Posts
About six months ago I bought a rusty and completely frozen WWI Vickers mount from a fellow board member. Today I finished restoring it. When I purchased it, it was missing one stud and the spring retaining plate. It had medium pitting but overall was solid and not a relic.

I have to say that two people provided valuable assistance to me. One person was Mike Duke who unfroze the piston from the mount housing, a task which I wisely knew he could do far better than me. He also fabricated new studs for me along with a replacement spring retainer plate. I hope to eventually find an original one.

The second person was Richard Knight in England (not a member of this forum). This incredibly generous man mentored me on how to rebuild the mount providing me with answers on the original materials used and provided drawings of the parts I needed to fabricate.

Below are a couple of pictures of the mount as I purchased it:
View attachment 117140
View attachment 117141
View attachment 117142

and as it exists today after restoration:
View attachment 117143
View attachment 117144
View attachment 117145
Excellent job on bringing another piece of history back to life!(y)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,071 Posts
Great job Redroth (y) I know you spent quite a bit of time on this and it clearly shows in the end result. Very nice job my friend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,414 Posts
Looks great. What paint did you use?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,470 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Looks great. What paint did you use?
I used an automotive paint. I went to a specialty paint store that matches colors, mixes paints, and can place the paint in spray cans, not cheap (I think around $30 a can including paint) but I have always had good luck doing it this way.

I gave them the rear leg from my WWI Vickers tripod and asked them to match color and level of gloss. A few days later it was ready, I paid an extra $5 so they would save the formula in their files in case I wanted additional paint in the future (a wise move as it turns out).

I am getting ready to restore my 1915/1916 Canadian marked Vickers tripod next, every thing is stripped so I am almost ready. Do not call me Mike Duke junior....

Material property Wood Tints and shades Cutlery Kitchen utensil
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,414 Posts
I used an automotive paint. I went to a specialty paint store that matches colors, mixes paints, and can place the paint in spray cans, not cheap (I think around $30 a can including paint) but I have always had good luck doing it this way.

I gave them the rear leg from my WWI Vickers tripod and asked them to match color and level of gloss. A few days later it was ready, I paid an extra $5 so they would save the formula in their files in case I wanted additional paint in the future (a wise move as it turns out).

I am getting ready to restore my 1915/1916 Canadian marked Vickers tripod next, every thing is stripped so I am almost ready. Do not call me Mike Duke junior....

View attachment 117178
Thanks much. With two that have been on my to paint list for years I will try your method for a paint source.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,040 Posts
Wow Redroth! You really are a man of many talents. Obviously no stranger to restorations either. Excellent job and impressive to say the least.
CaptMax
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,040 Posts
Does not hold a candle to your amazing Ferret restoration. Hmmmm never hear anything about that bad boy...
I hope to update my Ferret thread shortly with what has been happening. I did retire last year so it seems I have even less time now to do the things I like. Also did a major remodel on the shop which was really needed as it had been at least 15 years since it was last painted even. I will be sure to update the thread soon to at least keep those who are interested up to date on the project.
Stay tuned.......
CaptMax
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,675 Posts
WOW! That looks absolutely amazing! If you hadn't written that it was the same tripod, I would have not thought it was the same tripod. Outstanding work on an incredibly, incredibly, incredibly rare Vickers MG accessory!
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top