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So not long ago, I ended up with a deactivated Mg08/15 feed block. The sliding mechanism had been welded to the housing at a single point (Courtesy of Uncle Sam post war). To add insult to injury, they also broke the arm on the bottom of the block as is commonly encountered in the doughboy trophy guns.

Now, I like to think I'm an engineer. And I spent a lot of time in college modeling random junk for assignments. So I got it in my head to make a CAD model of this feed block. I can knock out the weld pretty easily, but how do you remove the spring latch for the belt? (Picture is just something I pulled off the internet for reference)

I can see a middle section with a hole. There was a cotter pin inside, but after I removed it, nothing seemed ready to come apart. I've fiddled with it in various ways, but nothing got me anywhere, and I certainly don't want to break this thing!

How the heck do you take this German overengineering apart?
 

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You are on the right track. Its a long shaft that goes in from the right to the left as you have the picture above. Its got 100 years of rust and crap holding it in. You should apply some heat and take a brass punch to the part sticking out of the left side of the feedblock. Its really not that over engineered in this case.
 

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I trust you have been soaking it in kroil or pb blaster penetrating oil. If that doesn’t do it and you don’t care about removing the finish soak it in evaporust.
that unfroze a WWI mount I had that was picked off a battlefield.
 

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A half-hour boil in plain old tap water can also help unseize things. Unlike Evaporust, it can actually restore the finish if there's any rust. The only caveat is that you have to dry things off very quickly, which is easy to do with compressed air and either a torch or heat gun/blow dryer. It took several days, but mine finally came apart after alternating between penetrating oil soaks and boiling.
 
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