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Discussion Starter #1
Grabbed these from freinds. Was going to pass them off to a ham radio guy but debating what to do.
Here are what I have, no accessories, just the units


Is it worth cleaning them up getting mics, antennas, license? I didnt want another hobby but they are pretty cool. What is involved in licensing? What exactly are these peices. One looks UHF, A transmitter, and I guess a reciever? I have not had much time to read up on them. The Johnson viking Ranger II seems to have lots of good things said about it.
 

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I recall all those brands from when I was into Radios in the early 70's.

The Johnson & Heathkit would be my first choice to get on line.

Those are all "tube" radios I'm sure and that may be an issue.

The Heathkits were a build it yourself rig....at least some of them....they may have sold completed rigs at some point.

Hook up an antenna and see if the receiver part works.

Some radios need the Mic plugged in to function /Receive.

Power cords may be a challenge if you didn't get them but are similar to the shape of the tubes ( round plug with a bunch of pins. Not all pins are used though.

Likely is a diagram of plug on the back or under the cover.

Extreme High Voltage in some parts of these...Usually is a warning label under cover.

Good Luck.
 

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From top down:

The Hallicrafters is a 1950s era receiver (only) that is general coverage, meaning it can receive a wide range of commercial as well as ham frequencies.

The Ranger II in the middle is a ham band transmitter (only), one of the early tunable (VFO) transmitters although it could still use a crystal to determine the output frequency. This would be inserted into the round crystal socket seen on the front. Probably 750-1000 volts inside for the plate. Not sure if the power supply was integral or separate.

The Heathkit SB-101 was a very popular 60s era transceiver, meaning it can both transmit and receive. As I recall, it required a separate power supply and, again, 750 volts or so inside.

All are tube type machines that would not be used today because of the tremendous technical advances since their time - except by old guys like me reliving their early days :)

There are collectors of vintage radios. Prices are a bit of timing luck and a lot depends on condition.

Neat stuff - I had a lot of fun with that sort of gear.

Don
W4DFN
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks Don, appreciate the time.
 

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If you are going to get a tech license I'd probably buy a radio. I have an ICOM 2200H (2 Meter) and a Kenwood 520 (Tube radio) tube stuff is neat but you have to dip the plate etc and adjust the radio to the antenna which sometimes is a pain in the ass. It is interesting talking to someone 12,000 miles away in Japan from your kitchen table using nothing but a dipole antenna on 10 meters though. 10 meter has sucked as of late but when it does come in it does so with a vengeance.

Robert
K4LZR
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The idea Robert is to avoid the expense..........




Hahahahahaha. :rofl: yep, I know, fixing replacing tubes, antennae mic., etc etc.
 
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