1919 A4 Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
703 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Do you do this everytime you shoot it?
Everytime you change ammo makes?
Change from links to belts?
Anytime there are problems?
Constantly?

I just want to be safe and I am new to this stuff.
I currently check it each time I take it to the range.
Is this enough? I have had no problems but want none.

Thanks!
 

·
Master Window Licker
Joined
·
2,853 Posts
Everytime i take it out and every several thousand i recheck it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,144 Posts
Unless the barrel moves on you, you only need to re headspace the gun if you change ammo brands/types or if you disassemble the gun to the point of disturbing the setting.

If you don't change ammo brands/types, you can assume that it is going to be the same size and should run just like the previous belt did.

Of course, practice is always a good thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
864 Posts
I use original GI barrels and good quality ammo. I head space according to the JM Browning method and only check it when I remove the barrel and reinstall/replace it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
319 Posts
Depening on caliber, get a military issue headspace (timing gauge also for FA)
gauge.

There is no way to screw this up if you do it according to the TM and have the above items. Doing it this way ensures that you will not hurt yourself or other people near the weapon when firsed.

How often to check it? Check the headspace WITH A GAUGE and do a function check before you shoot each time. After this is done, your will fire the weapon.

Depending on your ambient climate temperature, humidity, ammo used and cleanliness of the weapon, always re-check the headspace after 100rds. Do that sequence for at least 3 cycles. If you are in extreamly hot weather, such as Iraq, you will find that your headpace will change as the sun warms up the weapon quite quickly and the headspace WILL change. Yes, you must contact the TC VHL CDR and tell he/she that you are UNLOADING the weapon and re-checking the headspace and do a function check. Once reloaded, tell the above personnel that it is reloaded, headspace and function checked and back in service.

My lube of choice: Remington Oil wiped on with a thin coat of LSA medium weight, or light weight LSA in a pinch. Do this on all the bearing surfaces inside the receiver as well as the bolt, barrel extention and barrel threads. Then "relube" with keylock graphite on all these areas.

This has worked for me for many years in high humidity, low humidity and two wars in the Persian Gulf countries.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top