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OK, so it's easy to pack small parts for mailing -- bubble wrap inside a Tyvek envelope or cardboard box. But for those of us who don't regularly ship a full parts set, what's the best way to pack it? A plastic bag and bubble wrap for smaller parts, and then -- what? Barrels, side plates, action pieces in newspaper, (not peanuts, I'm sure, because of shifting) or air pillows and cardboard pieces inside a cardboard box, and then wrapped securely with packing tape? How to best keep the barrel inside the box when Fedex, et al., try to bust it up? I know they can destroy a Pelican case, but is there anything short of a wood crate that'll sorta work?


Carry On!
Gary
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Improper packing is something I see that causes in my opinion more damage to parts than the actual use of them would cause. Often times we receive items tossed in a box with no wrapping, shreds or other packing material. You can hear ever piece banging against each other as the box is brought from the delivery vehicle to the door. These same people would probably be the first to blame UPS or FedEx for the damage.

Shredded paper works well for packing material. Double tape all seams. Don't use a damaged used box, new is best. Avoid thin sided boxes. Have at least two inches between the edges of the box and the items being shipped, fill the space with shreds. Before final sealing, shake the box, if you hear or feel any thing move inside, add more shreds or other packing material.

You cannot have too much packing material in the box.

I have been in the mail order business over 19 years and have yet to have an item damaged in shipping.
 

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In addition to what Kirby said, barrels can be protected with foam tubing. Catch "water weenie" flotation devices on sale at a dollar store and pick up a few. For most rifle and small gauge shotgun barrels cut the weenie about four inches longer than the barrel. Push the barrel into the hollow center and secure each end with a zip tie tight enough to close off the hole. For fat barrels like the 1919 you may have to make one cut from outside to center, end to end. Push the barrel into the cut and secure with multiple zip ties. Either way the barrel is protected as are the parts around it. Never had one damage a box using the water weenie method. Costs about a buck a barrel.
 

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The biggest thing in shipping a bunch of parts is to pack them separate and then tape them together so they don't beat the heck out of each other during transit. I always go overboard when shipping parts as it drives me nuts when some people just don't care and toss stuff in and you open a box of scrap, ask me how I know? I sent my best 4 BA bolts off to be machined (by someone here) and the prick sent them back loose with newspaper not even wrapped or taped together and after it took me 5 years to find these bolts for the best BA builds in the country I was a little more than pissed of when I opened the box! Take care and think smart and you will be ok, just imagine drunk monkeys handling your stuff along the way and go from there.
 

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I recommend bubble wrap all parts, use a sturdy box, and I use foam peanuts to fill any voids so nothing moves. Never have any issues shipping items. For large items like tripods I also use old blankets for the legs.
 

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I ship a lot of beltfeds and a lot of parts. The only way peanuts protect packed items is if they are compressed into the carton around the centered items. If compressed, they do not separate and allow the items to move around. When the box is filled, overfill it a bit and compress the peanuts with the closing flaps. Reinforce the ends with fibber glass embedded tape.
I cut 2" styrofoam pieces to fit into each end with a couple layers of heavy cardboard on the outside end by the flaps to keep barrels or heavy items from blowing through the ends of the box.
Smaller cartons with heavy items should be wrapped at ends and middle with reinforced tape.
The shippers can wreck any box you try to send including plywood crates in my experience.
Insure adequately and send USPS registered if you want complete and reliable security. FWIW
 

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All corners get taped, bottom seam inside and out. After wrappingveach individual part place in larger heavy plastic bag and bundle with tape so they do not rattle against each other. Also line potential stike points that if box is tossed 5 ft off a truck that the parts will not drive through. Run full line of tapearound box lengthways then three lines around diameter. If you figure the recipient will be cussing as they cut it free then they will be pleased when everything is intact. I will use styrofoam or other foams to include the heavy duty insulation boards to line interiors if need be. As Bob pointed out, if the object just drives through the peanuts then its no good.
 

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Polyethylene foam, fiber reinforced packing tape, bubble wrap, are the main things I use. The packed box must pass the shake test. Also, consider USPS flat rate boxes for the loose parts.

E
 

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I like to use the cheap plastic rifle cases to ship 1919s in.

Parts I like wrapped in plastic and or paper. Many separate wrappings.

2 people have shipped me guns and parts wrapped in old socks.
 

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Pvc pipe, get that durable foam use the end as template to cut the foam to fit, make a couple extra to act as spacers with holes for the barrel to pass through as well as ends. The heavier the object the more likely the abuse during shipping will be excessive, esp a .50 barrel, the gorillas will have fun tossing it around
 

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Hey Gary assemble the receiver, aside from drive rod spring. I use that packing film and wrap it up good. Bbl inside shroud, wrap it good in film with drive rod spring in there too. Foam or something between the two halves, then wrap it in bubble wrap and film, again, into one parcel. Works better than throwing loose in one box with one piece of tape holding it together. If you ship anything to GSG, put his addy inside the box too. His post office most likely hates him or something:dunno: must of forgot the Xmas tip.:rofl:
 

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PVC pipe barrel storage tubes

I made holders for my spare 1919 barrels out of PVC pipe to keep them from getting banged up in storage. I have never shipped one anywhere but I'm sure they would make a great shipping container. Purchased a 10ft length of PVC pipe along with end caps, male thread adapters and threaded caps from Home Depot. Cut the pipe to the appropriate length and glued a cap on one end. Glued the male thread adapter on the other end. Slide the barrel inside the tube and screw the end cap on. Keeps the barrels safe and sound and makes sure the threads and the crown don't get damaged. I grease the threads on the cap because sometimes when you screw the cap on it can be a bear to unscrew it again. The pipe and fittings are cheap so it literally cost's only a few bucks to make each tube.
 
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