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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings,

Does anyone know what IMC is? It is marked on this part and I'd like to know if it is a MG part.

This was in a box of dummy M73 gun parts that came with my classic car project. For 10y I assumed it was home made. The box has a pair of decent aluminum barrels/ jackets/ flash hiders assemblies (I welded on mounting plates and bolted them to mantlet), a nasty steel pipe/ jacket thing (probably made on a drill press) and a lot of milled aluminum receiver parts (truly horrible). The other day I noticed the machine work on part is really well done, too good for a fab. Also it has an IMC marking.

My guess- was used as a pattern. It might be an actual mg part or a misguided commercially made 1919 replica component, or a machinist good at making scrap but made something so fine he initialed it.

Any ideas? Thanks. Jim



https://s13.postimg.org/xlq1tdrlj/IMG_0013.jpg
 

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Jim I see no threads on it and the walls look to thick to be correct for a browning, that being said what is it made out of steel or aluminum? IMC is not a Browning makers mark that is for sure so my best guess was somebody's handy work for making dummy/display guns? Russ
 

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Hi Russ,
It's steel. The ends appear hack-sawed. I'll measure the wall thickness and post later. Maybe .065". It is zinc or cad plated. Looks like std welded steel fence post but those holes could not be any straighter and there are no burrs inside or out. If deburred it shows no tooling marks of that process.

Seems odd a machine shop would have stamped the letters. Google search of the acronym came up with an Indiana Metal Craft (art/gifts) plus a large machine shop in Indianapolis. Their web site mentions "Tier 2 Government/ Military", as well as other common industries.

There is a lot of knowledge here. If no one has heard of IMC in a MG context it probably some machine shop job, maybe for the Irac replica folks (was OH now VA).

It is not important to know, more of a puzzle.

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Wall is ~.096", OD is about 1.890.

One of the two original M73 barrel extensions. Looks like it will need a little work.

 

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Jim I am not familiar with the M73 or the makers of it but there are a couple here whom are. Threads like this help us all learn something new so hopefully a few of the buys will chime in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
From what I have read they were a miserable MG. Wiki says that the M73 was designed at RIA and made by GE. Here is an image from the army TM.



Worse, they put 'em in T50 turrets where they were a juggling act to operate- manual traverse hand wheel w/left hand, elevation and fire button w/ right, while looking thru a periscope w/ eye a few inches to the right of the feed tray, while sitting and spinning around in a little basket...

Here is a vintage pic I swiped off the internet. This one has twin M37's. The turret gearbox hand wheel is on the left, next to it the fire control box and the scope. Below, the drivers hand is resting on the ready round boxes.



Turrets had different gun options- twin M73's in 7.62, M2HB left /.30 cal right (1919A4 fixed) were common (US), twin M1919's in .30cal (ARVN), twin MG42 (export), twin M60's (late), Minigun (a few prototypes). The TM (and the few photos I have seen) shows the Browning guns are triggered by 24V electric solenoids on a bracket (at/behind rear mounting pin), with a small push rod going up thru what looks like the back of the bottom plate. The guns in the pic have grips so they might have been cobbled up in the field.
 
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