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College, two jobs, and a social life steal away all my shooting time, so for the first time in a year I let my M1 sling some lead down range. It amazes me what a 70+ year old rifle can do. This was my almost all original 1944 Springfield at 100 yards. One grouping was held over the X, the other at the 9.
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PhD in Over-Engineering
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Sweet! These old warhorses just keep on going. Was just reading the SGN article on rebarreling and bringing back to life an old, worn out M1. Can't keep them down! Thanks for posting!
 

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Sweet! These old warhorses just keep on going. Was just reading the SGN article on rebarreling and bringing back to life an old, worn out M1. Can't keep them down! Thanks for posting!
No kidding. I know of garands who have shot out 3 or 4 barrels and are still going. WWII was a heck of a time for military weapons. And no problems, thanks for commenting!
 

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Sling her up tight in the prone position and she will group better than that at 100 unless the barrel is worn. Nice Duramax, BTW.
 

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Sling her up tight in the prone position and she will group better than that at 100 unless the barrel is worn. Nice Duramax, BTW.
I was cursing myself for being in a hurry and leaving the sling at home, once I got to the range. I know she can do way better than I'll ever be able to do! Lol! And thank you, she's my pride and joy as a college student, lol.
 

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Wait a minute. Are you saying you got in the ten ring first time out? There is definitely something wrong with your rifle. It is supposed to take at least fifteen rounds to even get on target let alone in the black. Go back and set the aperture all the way down. Then click it up about eight clicks. Then shoot three rounds unload the rifle and clear the weapon and go down range and check the target. Repeat the process at least four times. It is unprofessional and immoral to get on target that early. How are you going to make an afternoon of it if you get in the black that quick.

Seriously I have probably shot better with an M1 at 400 yards than I shot with other guns at 100 yards. That happened at a National Guard Rifle match back in the 60s. I could never do that again but the rifle could I am sure.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Wait a minute. Are you saying you got in the ten ring first time out? There is definitely something wrong with your rifle. It is supposed to take at least fifteen rounds to even get on target let alone in the black. Go back and set the aperture all the way down. Then click it up about eight clicks. Then shoot three rounds unload the rifle and clear the weapon and go down range and check the target. Repeat the process at least four times. It is unprofessional and immoral to get on target that early. How are you going to make an afternoon of it if you get in the black that quick.

Seriously I have probably shot better with an M1 at 400 yards than I shot with other guns at 100 yards. That happened at a National Guard Rifle match back in the 60s. I could never do that again but the rifle could I am sure.
I got a good laugh out of this. I was surprised, as it usually takes quite a bit of walking to get her in the 10. When I left I had only shot for about 45min and was disappointed, lol.

On a side note, it's insane how hot these things get after about 48 rounds, even with breaks in between clips. I can't imagine carrying one after a firefight.
 

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I got a good laugh out of this. I was surprised, as it usually takes quite a bit of walking to get her in the 10. When I left I had only shot for about 45min and was disappointed, lol.

On a side note, it's insane how hot these things get after about 48 rounds, even with breaks in between clips. I can't imagine carrying one after a firefight.
Hot yes. If your one of the old traditionalists like me you'll oil your stock with linseed oil and it looks as nice as varnish until it gets hot and the oil starts to boil out and get all over your hand. (also happens if left in the sun to long) It is actually possible to char the wood if it gets too hot. I have never seen that done on an M1 but Korean veterans will attest to it. I did see an M14 stock with the barrel channel black as charcoal.
 

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"The greatest battle implement ever devised" attributed to General George S. Patton
 

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Hot yes. If your one of the old traditionalists like me you'll oil your stock with linseed oil and it looks as nice as varnish until it gets hot and the oil starts to boil out and get all over your hand. (also happens if left in the sun to long) It is actually possible to char the wood if it gets too hot. I have never seen that done on an M1 but Korean veterans will attest to it. I did see an M14 stock with the barrel channel black as charcoal.
I got blessed with a beautiful stock that hasn't piled on me yet. I've gotten her pretty hot, and had no oils seep out. But I remember as you said, readying a few accounts of burning hand guards off the rifle during long firefights. I can't even imagine how bad a machine gun must get..
 

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I got blessed with a beautiful stock that hasn't piled on me yet. I've gotten her pretty hot, and had no oils seep out. But I remember as you said, readying a few accounts of burning hand guards off the rifle during long firefights. I can't even imagine how bad a machine gun must get..
I have seen .50 Cal BMGs so hot the bullets were going in every direction but straight. I can attest that a BAR will be very hot after firing one magazine in slow bursts and I have a burn spot on my arm to prove it. I could never figure out why the military thought the M1 barrel had to be covered almost the full length. I guess they thought they were protecting the shooter more than anything. It may also have something to do with vapor rising from the barrel that would interfere with sighting. They must have changed their mind when the M14 came out.
 

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If I remember correctly, linseed oil was only substituted for stocks when the Axis Forces cut of the supply of tung oil -- which is still hard to find in its pure form.

Carry On!
Gary
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If I remember correctly, linseed oil was only substituted for stocks when the Axis Forces cut of the supply of tung oil -- which is still hard to find in its pure form.

Carry On!
Gary
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When I was in Army basic training in 1964 we were still using linseed oil on the stocks of our M14s. This was before the synthetic stocks were issued and we had a few wood ones broken during training. At that time the walnut stocks would be replaced with birch stocks when they broke. My rifle had a birch stock and it looked like crap. We were told to use the linseed oil on our stocks but I don't recall anyone actually doing so either with the walnut or the birch stock. I always felt that the oil would not improve the appearance of my rifle. It had obviously been stained to make it darker but it still looked like crap. Not only that but the rifles in my company had most of the parkerized finish worn off. They looked like they had been through a war which I thought was odd as the Army had only been using the M14 for a couple years at that time. In another unit I was with they had M14s that looked like new rifles all with walnut stocks and they appeared to have been oiled and looked pretty good. Many years later (around 1972) while other National Guard units were getting M16A1s my unit got M14s which did not hurt my feelings as I had shot expert with my beat up M14 in basic. Those M14 rifles looked like rebuilt rifles and some had walnut stocks and some birch and some plastic. But I don't remember using linseed oil on the wood ones and I don't think they even had any in the supply system. Prior to that time I think we had some linseed oil for our M1 rifles and carbines but I don't remember using it. It took too long to soak in, took many coats and made the rifle greasy and hard to handle until it dried.
 
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