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I have both, I don't think they are particularly rare...although very cool of your uncle to think of you and send them along to you. Nice score!
 

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You can find them both on eBay in new printing and original printings, prices vary, but they're cool nonetheless.

Your uncle is super cool! :cool:
 

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Nice manuals. the one on the left appears to be a reprint, as I have one exactly like it, and have seen several more. the down side is that for the most part, old manuals to not command high prices except for the Colt Thompson paper, where collectors drive up pricing....
I have a bunch of old manuals I have been selling ( and more to sell) and they really do not draw big bucks. I have original 1918 BAR, Thompson, Greasegun etc from WWII and just dont seem to get as much as you would expect. Local Museums have cabinets full of them.
 

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I like the reprinted , blown up versions much better.




as for cheap finds, my mom got me a bronze (bronze alloy) german infantry assault badge at a yard sale last week for $1. It will go on the wall of weird random **** in my reloading room.
 

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A neat addition to the collection from a thoughtful Uncle but as noted already, not really worth much. I have several different assorted ones I've collected over the years sitting in a pile. See stacks of them on tables at the local gun shows for sale for a few dollars each.
 

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Although reprints are available it is alway nice to have the originals. I have quite a library having worked for the National Guard and Army Reserve for over thirty years and done a bit of dumpster diving in my day. I have most weapons manuals back to the BAR and 03 Springfield and many on radios and even one on the Sherman Tank. Someone once gave me one Classified "Secret not to be taken into front line trenches." It was about the use of artillery fire on aircraft (dated 1917).

However I missed out on a manual on auto body repair from the 40s. Somebody else got it. It was interesting as back then they didn't have synthetic dent filler. Dents were filled with lead.

As I probably mentioned before when I was an armorer for the National Guard back in the 60s. I could never get my hands on a manual on any weapon and had to go by my copy of Small Arms of the World. Oh they had the manuals but they kept them locked up in their library so they could show the inspectors they had them. They probably only had one for each type weapon. In later years I was in a position to order manuals and we always had several for each weapon type I don't know how they do it now. Army regulations are on line and maybe the FMs and TMs are also.
 
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