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my M1-Garand has a 10,6xx serial number and a 1943 dated barrel. it is a S.A. rifle with the regular gas system. Is there any additional value with the low serial number? -stan
 

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Here is Canfield's list to determine originality of Gas Trap Garand rifles. The more of these you have the better:

Approximate serial no. range 81 to low 50,000's (your receiver was numbered in April of 1939).

Receiver guide ribs not built up.

22" gas trap type barrel with drawing number marked on top, "P" mark on right side, not dated.

Parkerized finish.

Stock not routed for butt trap recess, "long" barrel channel, large over small size holes in butt.

Cartouche "SA/SPG" (Stanley P. Gibbs), no crossed cannons, circle "P" without serifs on grip.

Lip type spacer on front handguard and handguard marked with drawing number.

No relief cut mod to rear handguard and handguard also marked with drawing number.

Spanner nut rear sight with flared arrows on adjustment knobs and short sight pinion with drawing number.

Original pattern front sight with straight protective ears.

Slant type op rod without relief milling at junction of tube and handle. Some very early op rods had drawing numbers stamped on top of handle.

Original screw-on gas trap cylinder with flutes on both sides and drawing number on rear ring.

Milled triggerguard with concentric rings and marked with drawing number

Virtually all parts were stamped with drawing numbers on early production gas trap rifles with some markings deleted as production ramped up, but all have more numbered parts than WWII Garands.

EXCEEDINGLY RARE and MANY FAKES ON THE MARKET.

Let us know what you find.
 

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As xdevildog posted - yes - they are rare. From what you posted your M1 was re-barreled in '43 and - I'm guessing - the majority of parts on your rifle are mid-war at the earliest - more than likely being rebuilt 2 times in its lifetime. Most gas traps were reworked as soon as the modified gas system was adopted - early war. That's probably the 2nd barrel yours has had on it. What makes it a "rare" rifle is that a true Garand collector NEEDS a gas trap in their collection - in all reality there were only 50,000ish built - not a lot considering there were more than 3,000,000 built in total. Very few survived unaltered since being built - most "correct" (fake) gas traps you see on the market have new made barrels, stocks and gas piston assemblies. To rebuild it into a "correct" gas trap would be next to impossible - the original barrels were pulled and scrapped - as were the original sight assemblies, bolts, stocks and most other components - upgraded in the field. That being said - it IS worth more than a standard early to mid-war Garand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
m1 garand value

it is in good to very good condition, I will be taking it with me to my home in maui. what should I insure it for? - stan
 

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As xdevildog posted - yes - they are rare. From what you posted your M1 was re-barreled in '43 and - I'm guessing - the majority of parts on your rifle are mid-war at the earliest - more than likely being rebuilt 2 times in its lifetime. Most gas traps were reworked as soon as the modified gas system was adopted - early war. That's probably the 2nd barrel yours has had on it. What makes it a "rare" rifle is that a true Garand collector NEEDS a gas trap in their collection - in all reality there were only 50,000ish built - not a lot considering there were more than 3,000,000 built in total. Very few survived unaltered since being built - most "correct" (fake) gas traps you see on the market have new made barrels, stocks and gas piston assemblies. To rebuild it into a "correct" gas trap would be next to impossible - the original barrels were pulled and scrapped - as were the original sight assemblies, bolts, stocks and most other components - upgraded in the field. That being said - it IS worth more than a standard early to mid-war Garand.
IMHO, it's not worth much more unless the receiver has NOT been modified for the 7th round stoppage problem. I sold my last real gas trap, 54,xxx, rifle for 10K back around 1990.
 

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it is in good to very good condition, I will be taking it with me to my home in maui. what should I insure it for? - stan
Depends on who you are insuring it with. If you are shipping it to yourself through an FFL on Maui by UPS or FedEx my experience has been that asking for any additional insurance on a firearm or labeling anything as an "antique" or "collectible" causes all kinds of grief far out of proportion to what you are asking them to do. Haven't used USPS to ship long guns for a long time, but their insurance should be much easier to acquire.

If you are insuring it with a collectible firearm insurance agency directly then you are generally covered for loss or damage during transport by a common carrier - including if you take it in checked baggage. I use http://collectinsure.com/what-we-insure/guns-knives-accessories and am very happy with them, but I believe there are other companies out there. Have never looked into the NRA insurance, so can't comment on that.

Regardless, I would think you could insure it for a bit of a premium, say $2k, even if the only gas trap part on the weapon is the receiver.
 

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Unless it has original finish and does not have the 7th round modification done it has no more value than any other later receiver.
 

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To piggyback a question, when did the gas trap production stop? Have a neighbor who says they have a garand that serial number is in 1941 production range.
 

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Thanks Ranger.
 
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