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Discussion Starter #1
Looking for a photo of a Russian M1910 condensing hose connector. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #3
There are photos of M1910s with hoses attached when used in the quad anti aircraft mount.
 

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There are photos of M1910s with hoses attached when used in the quad anti aircraft mount.
I believe this is more than just steam condenser hose. Note that all waterjackets are connected together at the steam tube site. Since they were facing up, I think that tended to expose the front of the barrel. Either way, thats looking for a needle in a haystack.
 

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It appears that the only hose connectors that exist in any quantity are the finn made connectors which screw onto the threaded stud and have the small opposed handles to tighten it.
The 1905s had one type I know of which is a round ferrule with two bands of single row knurling on either end, and it appears that these were assembled the same way as the Finn ones with a flanged tube inserted into the ferrule and then the hose wired to that tube.
In all the various pictures I have seen of Russian soldiers using the 1910s, none show a water can or hose. I have asked several Russian collectors about water cans, hoses and other parts to a steam capture system, but no one has come up with pics or equipment that is Russian made. Seems to me that there should be some evidence of mounting hardware, hoses and cans but it has not crossed my research.

Bob Naess
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I believe this is more than just steam condenser hose. Note that all waterjackets are connected together at the steam tube site. Since they were facing up, I think that tended to expose the front of the barrel. Either way, thats looking for a needle in a haystack.
It never hurts to look does it?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It appears that the only hose connectors that exist in any quantity are the finn made connectors which screw onto the threaded stud and have the small opposed handles to tighten it.
The 1905s had one type I know of which is a round ferrule with two bands of single row knurling on either end, and it appears that these were assembled the same way as the Finn ones with a flanged tube inserted into the ferrule and then the hose wired to that tube.
In all the various pictures I have seen of Russian soldiers using the 1910s, none show a water can or hose. I have asked several Russian collectors about water cans, hoses and other parts to a steam capture system, but no one has come up with pics or equipment that is Russian made. Seems to me that there should be some evidence of mounting hardware, hoses and cans but it has not crossed my research.

Bob Naess
Bob, I have never seen a combat photo of Red Army troops using a water can or hose. The closest I have found has been the quad AA setup. My original post about this came up because a fellow I know in Ukraine asked me about connectors a few days ago. Like you the only ones I have seen are Finnish, same with the condensing cans.
 

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The quad mount does not use the usual steam port, and just corks them closed, piping the steam from the front end of the 4 steam tubes, so it isn't even applicable to this issue.
As for Russian steam capture parts, I've been keeping an eye out for twenty years and never have come across anything at all, so in my opinion looking is a waste of time. If there is anything out there, some one wil eventually point it out........
Nothing wrong with the Finn made closures.

Bob Naess
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Waste of time.
I will keep that in mind the next time someone calls me looking for a rare item some might call a needle in a hay stack and I happen to have one in a storage box.
 

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>I will keep that in mind the next time someone calls me looking for a rare item some might call a needle in a hay stack and I happen to have one in a storage box.<

If it is that rare and valuable you won't let go of it anyway, right? And most of the time, if you have one , that means there are more out there. But, there are lots of parts and guns that have proven over time to just not be available, either because they were never available, and are extremely scarce and have been "collected" and are not on the market. These days, anything "rare" is on the list of dozens of guys, many with lots of money, another factor that makes it difficult to get rare stuff.
I have told countless people questing for these items that after forty plus years of looking for some of them, they just are not out there. I get pooh poohed and laughed at, but eventually they come to realize that I might be right. I let other people do the looking and don't waste my time. If they find what I am after, word gets out. Maybe I get one, maybe not.
What I love are parts and accessories that show up that nobody knows about. Example in my recent experience is a Mauser made, 7.92 Lewsi drum, identical to the early pattern Brit drums. Not Czech, for instance. Popped up out of the blue and no one who is into Lewis guns or vintage guns had ever heard of or seen one.
The Finn connectors are correct, historical, useable and available. Not like Mandoza LMGs, brass Enfield Maxim feedblocks, Jap T97 front scope mounts, .........long list could follow, but it doesn't matter.......
FWIW

Bob
 

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>I will keep that in mind the next time someone calls me looking for a rare item some might call a needle in a hay stack and I happen to have one in a storage box.<

If it is that rare and valuable you won't let go of it anyway, right? And most of the time, if you have one , that means there are more out there. But, there are lots of parts and guns that have proven over time to just not be available, either because they were never available, and are extremely scarce and have been "collected" and are not on the market. These days, anything "rare" is on the list of dozens of guys, many with lots of money, another factor that makes it difficult to get rare stuff.
I have told countless people questing for these items that after forty plus years of looking for some of them, they just are not out there. I get pooh poohed and laughed at, but eventually they come to realize that I might be right. I let other people do the looking and don't waste my time. If they find what I am after, word gets out. Maybe I get one, maybe not.
What I love are parts and accessories that show up that nobody knows about. Example in my recent experience is a Mauser made, 7.92 Lewsi drum, identical to the early pattern Brit drums. Not Czech, for instance. Popped up out of the blue and no one who is into Lewis guns or vintage guns had ever heard of or seen one.
The Finn connectors are correct, historical, useable and available. Not like Mandoza LMGs, brass Enfield Maxim feedblocks, Jap T97 front scope mounts, .........long list could follow, but it doesn't matter.......
FWIW

Bob
besides that, my stuff isn't rare or valuable until I sell it to someone else!
 

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Well, the fun thing about "collecting" is looking for the stuff, isn't it ? Bob is right - to the extent that you can look for a left hand thread right feed doohicky for a XYZ watercooled blimp gun, but if they never made them, or all that were made went down on the Titanic, you just wont likely find them. Now it is not an issue of diligence, it is just a matter of luck. Being in the right place at the right time. I was walking through a gun show 25 years ago, saw a Lewis gun for sale. Talked to the guy, found out it was a whole collection for sale. I bought the Lewis, it's matching gun, the twin Lewis mount, a big box of Lewis "stuff", found out he had a big box of Maxim "Stuff". In the pile was a Brass Vickers cloth belt loader. so, Two Twin Lewis mounts. a couple boxes of drums. Feed blocks, locks, top covers.... You just never know. But, no left hand thread right feed doohicky for a XYZ watercooled blimp gun.

So, who has a Russian 54R cloth Maxim belt loader ? What did the Finns use to load those cloth belts with ? I got a pile of belts out of Bulgaria, now I need to load them.......
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I never tell anyone not to look, it could turn out in their search that they may find something I want too.

In this case I was not trying to find the item but a photo for someone else who has helped me find things in the past.
 

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I'm in the hunt club.

I fully understand that many of the things I am interested in are nearly impossible to find. I simply expect that my time spent hunting is just that...time spent. I am entertained by the hunt and the rare find.

Like Bob notes, there is some pretty cool and interesting stuff out there that simply needs the right set of eyes to see it. My favorite example is an original, all Colt manufacture, Russian contract Vickers lock! It is in 54R but was marked .303 in pen.

So, seek and ye shall (hopefully) find. Just set reasonable expectations and enjoy it he hunt.

Joe
 

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>So, who has a Russian 54R cloth Maxim belt loader ? What did the Finns use to load those cloth belts with ? I got a pile of belts out of Bulgaria, now I need to load them.......<

A few have come out of the Ukraine, but they are rehabilitated relic loaders and even with the new made parts, are rough and need some further rehab, which can be done, of course. they are patterned on the early Brit Maxim belt loaders and later Vickers type. Pricey, too.
Pusher plate loaders are currently the best option for loading the 54R belts if you really want to get the loading done efficiently.

Bob Naess
 

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>So, who has a Russian 54R cloth Maxim belt loader ? What did the Finns use to load those cloth belts with ? I got a pile of belts out of Bulgaria, now I need to load them.......<

A few have come out of the Ukraine, but they are rehabilitated relic loaders and even with the new made parts, are rough and need some further rehab, which can be done, of course. they are patterned on the early Brit Maxim belt loaders and later Vickers type. Pricey, too.
Pusher plate loaders are currently the best option for loading the 54R belts if you really want to get the loading done efficiently.

Bob Naess
I do have a couple of the MG51 loaders I bought years ago - Was looking at them, the other day. Wonder if they could be modified ? One steel, one brass, they are just pretty. New in the boxes. Will have to see what they could be used for. They are for a 8mm size cartridge . Would need a modified feed bin. not sure about the belt. I think they were intended for the German MG-34 /42 Gurt 33 ?
 
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