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That's wonderful (y) congrats on the new toy and please keep us posted with more pictures and maybe a video.
 
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Looks great! I see someone got rid of the problematic hydraulic accelerator pedal and went with a sleeved cable (like Ford should have done in the first place.) I owned an M20 at one time and the buyer, a reenactor, (and likely to keep it "all Ford". . . ha!) installed a 460 and C6 tranny. The original Hercules JXD is sometimes a bit lacking. I've now got a M8 that I'm soon going to be restoring so I hope it turns out close to as well as your M20.

Now, you'll need to get a .50 M2HB for it.
 

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Looks great! I see someone got rid of the problematic hydraulic accelerator pedal and went with a sleeved cable (like Ford should have done in the first place.) I owned an M20 at one time and the buyer, a reenactor, (and likely to keep it "all Ford". . . ha!) installed a 460 and C6 tranny. The original Hercules JXD is sometimes a bit lacking. I've now got a M8 that I'm soon going to be restoring so I hope it turns out close to as well as your M20.

Now, you'll need to get a .50 M2HB for it.
I will have to take out a loan to buy a deuce nowadays. I think a 30 will look real Nice.
 

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I have a half-track and I can tell you that you are probably better off with the M-20,the half-track weighs 20,000 pounds so going anymore then a couple of miles you need to trailer it,and it's not something you throw behind a 3/4 ton truck,plus tires are much cheaper then the tracks!
It looks like someone did a beautiful job on it.
I saw a picture from Europe during the war where someone built a small version of the half-track gun rail and mounted on an M20,I always thought that would be a nice addition!
 

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Great vehicle, I could only dream about owning one. I have always loved the half tracks but there is a lot to be said about tires instead of tracks. I think the M20 is probably more practical.
 

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Well, while the M20/M8 are wheeled vehicles, in my experience they are more maintenance intensive than the halftrack insofar as they need to be ran weekly or more often. As well as an M8 (in need of restoration), I've got an unrestored M2A1 halftrack that we keep on the farm and drive around thru the ditches, etc. for fun. As my Dad used to say "It'll go about anywhere without stopping . . . except past the fuel barrel." If you've got a grease gun (not an M3) and know how to change plugs and set points, you are good to go. The thing will go 45 MPH but gets about 2 MPG. And, it will start with a couple of revolutions of the engine . . . even after sitting for 6 months. And yes, it is heavy. But, there is nothing like a tracked vehicle!!! (Think Rat Patrol if you are old enough!!!)

The M8/M20 series is a very cool vehicle with its angular construction, It has hydraulic brakes (w/hydrovac), a hydraulic clutch and a hydraulic actuated accelerator system (w/master and slave (can we say this any more???) cylinder systems each). Great system if you are driving them everyday but if you let them sit for a little bit (like a collector) you are looking at some serious hydraulic system work to get them operable. That's why most folks that restore these vehicles sleeve the systems with stainless.

While both have great histories with combat service, of course there are the numbers. There were over 50K of the White pattern halftracks made vs 10-12K M8/M20s. BTW, there were two halftrack patterns: the White style with the 160AX (386 C.I.) White engine and the International Harvester style with a 450 C.I. Red Diamond engine. The White pattern was built by White, Diamond T, and Autocar. Only IHC built the IHC pattern. Most of the IHC ones were sent to Mother Russia. You can tell the difference between White and IHC because the IHCs have flat front fenders and the White style have fenders that have a dropped outside edge, especially to the rear of the wheel. In my opinion, automotively, the White style halftrack was one of the best, most reliable, longest lived vehicles built during WWII. They are just plain a TOUGH vehicle! Of course, they weren't much of a match against rifle caliber small arms fire or larger with only 1/4 inch case hardened armor (White pattern).
 

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Well, while the M20/M8 are wheeled vehicles, in my experience they are more maintenance intensive than the halftrack insofar as they need to be ran weekly or more often. As well as an M8 (in need of restoration), I've got an unrestored M2A1 halftrack that we keep on the farm and drive around thru the ditches, etc. for fun. As my Dad used to say "It'll go about anywhere without stopping . . . except past the fuel barrel." If you've got a grease gun (not an M3) and know how to change plugs and set points, you are good to go. The thing will go 45 MPH but gets about 2 MPG. And, it will start with a couple of revolutions of the engine . . . even after sitting for 6 months. And yes, it is heavy. But, there is nothing like a tracked vehicle!!! (Think Rat Patrol if you are old enough!!!)

The M8/M20 series is a very cool vehicle with its angular construction, It has hydraulic brakes (w/hydrovac), a hydraulic clutch and a hydraulic actuated accelerator system (w/master and slave (can we say this any more???) cylinder systems each). Great system if you are driving them everyday but if you let them sit for a little bit (like a collector) you are looking at some serious hydraulic system work to get them operable. That's why most folks that restore these vehicles sleeve the systems with stainless.

While both have great histories with combat service, of course there are the numbers. There were over 50K of the White pattern halftracks made vs 10-12K M8/M20s. BTW, there were two halftrack patterns: the White style with the 160AX (386 C.I.) White engine and the International Harvester style with a 450 C.I. Red Diamond engine. The White pattern was built by White, Diamond T, and Autocar. Only IHC built the IHC pattern. Most of the IHC ones were sent to Mother Russia. You can tell the difference between White and IHC because the IHCs have flat front fenders and the White style have fenders that have a dropped outside edge, especially to the rear of the wheel. In my opinion, automotively, the White style halftrack was one of the best, most reliable, longest lived vehicles built during WWII. They are just plain a TOUGH vehicle! Of course, they weren't much of a match against rifle caliber small arms fire or larger with only 1/4 inch case hardened armor (White pattern).
No doubt the half track is more affordable (to buy initially), but not to run. Remember those tracks? I'm told by owners that you get only 800 to 1500 miles on them. And each pair will cost you $5K. So..... after you factor the gas and track costs, yeah, the M20-M8 is really the easier way to go for most people.
 

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I'm glad I was able to get a couple good used tracks from all the parts vehicles I drug home to build my own,tracks have always been the biggest problem with half-tracks,for the longest time there weren't any then Israel released their back stock and everyone started restoring half-tracks.I lucked out and was able to drag home 3 units and two halves,I picked through all the pieces and found the best and sold the rest to finish mine.
Over the years is has not only been a great presentation piece but it has proven itself to be one tough vehicle,I have pull 3 semi trucks out of the sand down here,with both rear axels buried to the pumpkins!
 
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