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I've heard board members remark about the quality of machine work and one factor is machining finish. Better finish, better component? Not so fast. During wartime production, machines that made machine gun components were set up with hard stops and fixed tooling. A 'phonograph' finish was considered acceptable. Too fine of a finish reflects reduced productivity. More soldiers die. External surface finish was not a priority. American weapons traded beauty for function.

1919 production could be set up within days of order most anywhere in the world. For the forensic 1919 members, closely inspect and count the machine marks. They will be consistent. Look closely, was it an inch or a metric feed rate? And surely different feed rates were employed, inch and metric.

Machining marks can be beautiful and secure a little history.

Ryland
 

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I would think that in some parts in the gun it was desirable for holding lubrication. As well as possibly reducing friction with less surface contact. The design is so well thought out. I love going over the mechanical diagrams and learning the history. It's a hell of a gun for sure. I am proud to own one!

Thanks for the head up on the info. Next time I take mine apart I will look more closely. If you have some specific parts you'd like to compare let me know. I'd be glad to measure something.
 

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The original machine marks are part of the sexy. I have tried while cleaning up rivets on builds to file then sand following the machinemarks to try to preserve the wartime production look. I have also chosen my semi sideplates for my keeper guns based on if the maker created the correct blanchard grinding marks.

But I am fussy that way.
 

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If you want a side plate with the grinding marks, do the following. Run your rock sharpener discs just before you do your spark-off finish pass. This requires running your head all the way up to clean the rocks, then all the way back down to the finish pass. Or just set your feed too fast and dont do the spark-off. (requires really knowing your set-up to achieve correct thickness. J
 

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Not a 1919, but a wartime production. I took special care not to over polish my re-welded receiver. Some folks like shiny.....I like history. (pay no attention to the "in progress" home made sight base).

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Matt
 
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