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I just got a 1928 belt loader the other day and I am trying to get it running. It's giving me some problems. I disassembled it first and cleaned and oiled it good. I also adjusted the needles and specified in the manual (1/100th of an inch apart). I am loading .308 and the loader is supposedly setup for .308. Belts are BRAND NEW and virgin.

So...I'll put the first 2 cartridges in the first two loops of the belt, and lay the belted first round into the wheel, handle is down and rounds going into the black thread side of the belt, just like the manual says. Then close everything up, close the needles, as the manual says. When I start turning the crank, it will load maybe two-five rounds into the belt and then it will jam up. The problem happens after the stage where it slightly pushes a round into the belt and tries to move it to the next stage where it fully seats the round into the belt. The round will get crooked at an angle as it tries to move it into the next stage where it pushes the round fully into the belt, and then it will jam up.

Any ideas? Here's a couple of pics. You can see that it's getting cocked-eyed missing the loop. Also you can see that the belt is getting pushed out the side and causing the rounds to go more shallow into the belt with each load.





 

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"man of the cloth" Loader
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57Strat,
I used a Dremel , lightly polished the underside of the spring and made a small indentation at the centerline of the pusher in the spring. Try turning the front screw out (counterclockwise) about a half turn to free up the spring a little. You may even need to bend it a little. Also I run the upper needles out a little more than lower ones. This may help them to go in the belt. The '28's look close to the '18's but I haven't got to play with one yet
Hope this helps,
BA
 

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Discussion Starter #3
BAinMO said:
57Strat,
I used a Dremel , lightly polished the underside of the spring and made a small indentation at the centerline of the pusher in the spring. Try turning the front screw out (counterclockwise) about a half turn to free up the spring a little. You may even need to bend it a little. Also I run the upper needles out a little more than lower ones. This may help them to go in the belt. The '28's look close to the '18's but I haven't got to play with one yet
Hope this helps,
BA

Ok...loosening the front spring screw definitely helped to eliminate the rounds getting cocked eyed. But I still have the problem where the belt gets pushed father away with each round (causing rounds to be seated more shallow as each round gets loaded.

There should be a space of 1/100th of an inch between the needles...right? The needles should not be overlapping one another...correct????

I wonder if the fact these are brand new belts that's causing the problem? I did not open the loops up before attempting to load them. Is it an absolute requirement to open the loops up manually when using new belts?

Much thanks for the help.
 

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Strat you will have that very problem with every new belt you try to load.What has to take place is the pocket in the belt needs streched.If you take your time and load the belt the best you can and leave it sit overnight or a couple days then unload it and try it again.Rounds should seat almost fully in position and your loader will run it so much better and better with each loading.250 rnd belts are a ***** regardless 100 rnders are nice because they are filled and out of the way faster but it really makes no difference it just tricks your mind in to thinking your getting more done:D
New belts are just like wild women they all need broke in!!
 

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Strat,
I stretch my never loaded belts by throwing them over the track to my garage door and hanging a 5 gallon bucket (or other suitable device of about 30 lbs) from the brass tabs. Let them hang for a full 24hrs and they load as fast as you can crank the loader.
Good luck. And no, dont adjust the needles until they touch.
 

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i space my needles apart the thickness of a matchbook and they run great
 

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I space like BAR and don't pre stretch.After several reloads I wash and dry them. Then light starch and a hot ironing.
Sorry your colt gives you problems, Sounds like you need more tension on the serrated rollers. They also like a kind of rhythm. A little slower on the push part of the stroke,then faster on the remaining arc.
 

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1928 loader

It took me forever to get my 1918 loader running smoothly. First thing I do is spray the belts, wet, with Silicone lubricate spray made by Pyroil. You can get it at most auto parts stores. While still wet I shove 7.62x39 rounds into each pocket and let the belt dry over night. This sets the pockets in a partially open condition. After that the next most important thing is to have the needles set just right. ( a bloody process )This is no easy task as it takes trial and error. They must be straight, sharp and protuding just right. As a place to start I would suggest that the needles should protrude .010-.020 above and below the surface of the arms that they are attached to. The rest is guess work. Load the first round by hand till it is half way in the belt. The first round in the machine should be in position so the tip of the bullet is positioned just over the needles. Install the one round belt so that the first round is in position to be rammed into the belt and the next empty pocket is open and around the tip of the round sitting on the needles. Close all the related bars wheels and plates on to the belt and crank it at a relatively fast speed. The more failures you have the smarter you will get about what works and what doesn't. This is really a learning process. Once you get it running smoothly it is almost as fun as shooting the gun. Good luck and may God have mercy on your soul.
 

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1928 loader

It took me forever to get my 1918 loader running smoothly. First thing I do is spray the belts, wet, with Silicone lubricate spray made by Pyroil. You can get it at most auto parts stores. While still wet I shove 7.62x39 rounds into each pocket and let the belt dry over night. This sets the pockets in a partially open condition. After that the next most important thing is to have the needles set just right. ( a bloody process )This is no easy task as it takes trial and error. They must be straight, sharp and protuding just right. As a place to start I would suggest that the needles should protrude .010-.020 above and below the surface of the arms that they are attached to. The rest is guess work. Load the first round by hand till it is half way in the belt. The first round in the machine should be in position so the tip of the bullet is positioned just over the needles. Install the one round belt so that the first round is in position to be rammed into the belt and the next empty pocket is open and over the tip of the round sitting on the needles. Close all the related bars wheels and plates on to the belt and crank it at a relatively fast speed. The more failures you have the smarter you will get about what works and what doesn't. This is really a learning process. Once you get it running smoothly it is almost as fun as shooting the gun. Good luck and may God have mercy on your soul.
 
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