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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was offered this guy (Pictured below) for $350
It is natural gas powered. I don't have gas here. But a generous friend offered me a 200 gal propane tank for free (with 100 gal still inside) - about 30 miles of solid country roads away
Here are a list of my questions:
1. Just off of pics, is this an ok deal?
2. Is it difficult to convert nat gas to propane?
3. Any thoughts on moving a 200gal propane tank that is 1/2 full?
4. Any suggestions on an inline conditioner so I could safely power the house with it?
5. Any question that I am forgetting or just don't know enough to ask?


 

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1. Yep. I did a quick search and found similar used units for sale from $800 - $2,500.
2. Not normally. Usually just a matter of changing the natural gas "jets" (I forget the proper name) in the throttle body to those used for propane. We ran compressed natural gas fueled vehicles at my job before I retired and if memory serves that is about it. Check with Onan, they probably stock the conversion parts, and with your propane supplier.
3. Two things - check with your propane supplier and see if the tank meets their requirements, and prepare for about 400lbs of liquid propane to slosh around in the tank while you are moving it. Block the legs and strap that baby down.
4. Sorry, above my pay grade.
5. Check with your city or county building department to determine what type of structure is allowed/required to house the generator. They should also have minimum standards for location and type(s) of electrical connection(s) to the house feed. Also check with your electrical utility for their requirements and suggestions. If you can find a traveling mechanic, have the unit checked for the usual motor stuff - compression, valve train noise, etc. Try to get the user's manual from Onan if the seller doesn't have it. With a little luck it will be on their website in .pdf format. If possible test run it in place with a load before you buy and see if it meets the specs that Onan gives in the manual.
 

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1. Yep. I did a quick search and found similar used units for sale from $800 - $2,500.
2. Not normally. Usually just a matter of changing the natural gas "jets" (I forget the proper name) in the throttle body to those used for propane. We ran compressed natural gas fueled vehicles at my job before I retired and if memory serves that is about it. Check with Onan, they probably stock the conversion parts, and with your propane supplier.
3. Two things - check with your propane supplier and see if the tank meets their requirements, and prepare for about 400lbs of liquid propane to slosh around in the tank while you are moving it. Block the legs and strap that baby down.
4. Sorry, above my pay grade.
5. Check with your city or county building department to determine what type of structure is allowed/required to house the generator. They should also have minimum standards for location and type(s) of electrical connection(s) to the house feed. Also check with your electrical utility for their requirements and suggestions. If you can find a traveling mechanic, have the unit checked for the usual motor stuff - compression, valve train noise, etc. Try to get the user's manual from Onan if the seller doesn't have it. With a little luck it will be on their website in .pdf format. If possible test run it in place with a load before you buy and see if it meets the specs that Onan gives in the manual.
Xdevildog about covered it all. The "jets" are called orifices and LP ones are smaller than natural gas ones. They will vary depending upon the elevation above sea level where the equipment is installed. The spring in the gas valve must also be changed and gas pressure set with a manometer gauge. Looks like a good deal to me.
CaptMax
 

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If that thing checks out it is an outstanding deal. If you don't want it send it to me. Can't go wrong at that price if it runs out ok.

That unit will put out 3 phase or single phase voltage so you can run what ever you want with it.

steve
 

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...good deal all around....

....especially for the 200 gal propane tank....WITH 100 gal of fuel. I have a 20KW propane GERERAC...enough said.
 

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I am no expert by any means , but I do know that there are two main types of power systems . Those that power job site stuff ( lights , tools , etc. ) and those that can power refrigerators and A/Cs and electronics without damage . Has to do with the " pureness " of the power . Which is this one ?
Chris
 

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Does this have the transfer switch with it.

Biggest danger with aux power is not having a positive means of disconnecting commercial power and backing the generator into the the commercial system
 

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kkkriverrats SEZ" ".... Biggest danger with aux power is not having a positive means of disconnecting commercial power and backing the generator into the the commercial system."

Yep, "backfeeding" is dangerous, can kill lineworkers and is illegal here.


Carry On!
Gary
><>
 

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Super deal if it works. You'll probably have to spend way more on a transfer switch unless you just want to run extension cords to a few key places when needed. Beyond that, it's more than worth it as a 3ph source.
 

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kkkriverrats SEZ" ".... Biggest danger with aux power is not having a positive means of disconnecting commercial power and backing the generator into the the commercial system."

Yep, "backfeeding" is dangerous, can kill lineworkers and is illegal here.


Carry On!
Gary
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Probably illegal now, but the simple solution used to be yanking the meter until you didn't need the genny anymore.
No one up-line can get hurt that way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Probably illegal now, but the simple solution used to be yanking the meter until you didn't need the genny anymore.
No one up-line can get hurt that way.
I know it's not the "correct" way but when I built the house I had a 60 amp gen plug run to the outside. Assuming I would be the only one to ever hook up a gen, I know to throw the main breaker to avoid chance of back feed.
 

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I know it's not the "correct" way but when I built the house I had a 60 amp gen plug run to the outside. Assuming I would be the only one to ever hook up a gen, I know to throw the main breaker to avoid chance of back feed.
IMHO, this is too easy for somebody to accidentally flip it back. My suggestion for you, pull the electric meter out of the socket, set it someplace separate. Still not code, but damn hard for an idiot to defeat you.

To the OP, you stole that, great deal. My only comment, for an extended outage, its too big and will burn up lots of fuel. I run a 20KVA one for pumping water, air conditioning, welding, etc. and charging a forklift battery at the same time. Then shut it down and use an inverter to keep the freezer going.
 

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Usually they have a hole for a padlock . Use it and only you have a key . Better yet is to use one of those padlock " gates " . The gate keeps the switch from moving and everyone involved has their own lock/key on the gate and it can't be removed till all the locks are.
Chris
 

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A Lister engine bolted up to that would be the cats azz! VERY LOW fuel consumption.
 
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