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i recently here have purchased a semi auto 1919 a4 from AA and i would like to build a wood case to put it in and it will be like 4 more weeks before it comes in. So i was wondering if someone could be kind enough to post some measurements of their 1919a4 with a pistol grip with the barrel attached, where i can figure out about how much material i will need and where i can get some kind of an idea about the length, width height, and so on..... Or if any one knows a website that might sell a wood transit case for these guns i would greatly appreciate it... just thought it might be better to build or buy something to put it in while at the range than the gun case that comes with it and would look different at the range.. and by chance anyone know the measurments L,W and height of a 1917 tripod:confused thanks everyone and i am pretty much a newbie to the site but i will be willing to help out if someone is having a hard time finding things. And another reason why i would like to build one is carrying a 30 lb gun around is going to be ruff so i really dont want to have to carry it no more than i have to.
 

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If you ever think you'll add a crank device or spade grips then allow a little more room on the length, heigth and width at the rear. You'll have to get dimensions on spade grips and crank devices to determine how much you need to add. It's no fun building a case then finding out your accessories won't fit...ask me how I know ;).

I built a two level rolling case for my '28 water cooled and installed the removable upper floor and then bought a crank...the handle hit the floor. Fortunately, I was able to notch the floor in one corner to accommodate it. If it wasn't two levels the crank handle would have been sticking thru the lid.
 

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Cas4

Are you planning to put the 1917A1 tripod and the 1919A4 in the same crate? Just a reminder, the tripod is in two sections and both combined will weigh approximately 60 pounds. You might need a fork lift or U-Haul truck and refer dolly to haul it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
need measurements

Mainly this is what i would like to do build a case for my AA 1919a4 and have different places to put things for example this is what i would like to put.. a 250 round belt that would be loaded with ammo, room for 3 barrels, .308, 30-06, and a 8mm barrel if i can ever find one, room for tools and spare parts along with the gun i do realize that this will be a heavy and large case but i do plan on putting carpet in it to help prevent scratching and also i will put wheels on it where it will be more mobile. the tripod and the gun with accessories i dont plan on making it all into one box because i know by looking at the 1917a1 tripod it looks pretty big and i do plan on building a seperate case for it because its one from ohio ordnance the 1000.00 ones that never have been cut and its a orig ww2.... i have everything ordered that i can buy but havent gotten it in yet didnt know till the other day when i opened my checking account how much it cost to own one i was :eek: have already over 2500 in it and alot more to go. so for right now i am just wondering what is the Length,H,and width of the tripod on the a4 with a pistol grip trying to get some sort of an idea far as materials. thank you for your help everyone and thanks for the website
 

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If it helps, here's three pics of my two level case. I used lawn mower wheels on the rear with a piece of steel rod from Home Depot as an axle and an old caster under the front. I strap the heavy M35 pod on top in lieu of trying to put it inside. My spare barrels are under those loaded belts in that long compartment. It takes two guys to lift it into a pickup bed or I use ramps and do it by myself, but it's easy to pull around on the concrete deck at the range. This may be overkill for what you want, but if you ever make a water cooled or need to haul other accessories it won't be too big and it ain't that much more material.

The 1919 with a regular booster and not a flash hider is about 45" long from tip to grip. The receiver is about 8" high (with the rear sight folded down) by 22" long from front of the trunion to the rear of the grip. The receiver is about 2.5" wide and the cocking handle protrudes another 2".

Hope that helps.

The whole case


Top level


Bottom level with floor removed which rests on the compartment partitions
 

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Discussion Starter #7
need measurements

thanks loboslanding that helped me out alot the pictures is really what i was looking for. if i can ask you one more question any website you know that sells 8mm barrels and everything to convert a .308 to 8mm? trying to get out of paying 200.00 for 1000 rounds for ammo. i know people said stuff about a john mcguire barrel sorry for spelling if i got it wrong but i cant find his website
 

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Ammunitionstore http://www.ammunitionstore.com/ sells 8mm barrels for around $150, but they are temporarily out of stock. John McGuire sells a chrome lined barrel for around $250 (I think)...look under Members List at the top of this page and you can send him a private message and inquire. Dan at Angola Armory http://www.angolaarmory.com/1919a4.html sells the 30-06 booster you will need for $28 minus 25% this month. Several guys on this site sell the 8mm front stop made from a 308 stop...go to the 1919 ad forum and post that you need one and you'll get responses. You might post there for a barrel too and someone might have an extra laying around they will part with. That's all you need to convert. If you haven't already studied it, check out the converting tutorial on the home page under misc tutorials for all the details on converting.

Please carefully read this sticky thread located at the top of this forum http://1919a4.com/forums/showthread.php?t=818 and be sure you understand how to headspace the new gun before shooting...surplus 8mm can bite you if not done properly. Instead of the cheap cheap Yugo 8mm you might want to start with the more reliable Romanian ammo until you're really comfortable with the gun. Romanian is about 9 cents per round vs Yugo at 5 cents at http://www.centuryarms.com/shop/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=22&sort=20a&page=2 , but is safer when just getting acquainted with the 1919.

Good luck and let us know when that new gun arrives.
 

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measurements from my 1917A1 tripod

The 1917A1 tripod when folded up measures approx. 31 inches without the cradle, the width is from 9" to 13" because of the adjustment handles.

The cradle is approx is 151/2 inches in length and height is about 12" including the large pintle style thingy thet inserts into the numbered brass ring. The width including the knobs is about 7 inches. Sorry I don't have any photos.

I hope this helps ask any questions if there are any problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks loboslanding and kamikazi you all have been a wonderful help if theres anything that i can help you with let me know. the gun comes with a headspace gauge and a few more things i bought it from allied armament in the last week of july, i do have a friend that is a gunsmith so i will learn how to become familiar how to do it before i shoot it and everything. i know you dont have to be a gunsmith to headspace one of these its just that everything new i get far as a firearm id rather him show me everything about it and make me do it over and over than me screw up big time and hurt myself or others near by.
 

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csa, please read that thread I posted for you above and toss the headspace gage and follow method two in the headspacing tutorial with the modifications I mention in the warning thread. You might want to print it out, along with this post, and have your smitty study it before you two decide on how you're going to set up your gun. Even if he is extremely familliar with a GI 1919, the headspacing method using a gage is not reliable due to our semi mods and mix-match of parts and especially using 8mm ammo.

Just so you and he understand my reasoning I'd like to take a moment and explain it. These guns come with two different bolts; 308 (7.62 stamped on top of the bolt) or original 30-06. The primary difference is that the T slot in the front of the bolt that the round slides down is deeper on a 308 bolt because the case rim is slightly thicker than a 30-06 round. A 308 round is a bit too snug in most 30-06 bolts and due to the thicker rim the rounds tend to hang up in the T slot. The ideal would be to have two bolts and use an '06 bolt to feed '06 and 8mm rounds and a 308 bolt to feed 308. Most all of us use a 308 bolt because it will feed all three rounds.

However, here's the down side and it only takes a little care and understanding to shoot crap 8mm with a 308 bolt. Because the 308 T slot is deeper the 8mm rounds have "slop" in the slot which screws up trying to use a gage to headspace it. Because the 8mm round has a gap in the T slot there is automatically some unintentional headspace built into the arrangement. Just to clarify here, headspace on a 1919 is not like any other weapon and it is defined as the distance from the rear of the barrel to the face of the bolt...not the face of the T slot ears, but the face of the bolt where the firing pin hole is located. The reason for adjustable headspace on a 1919 is to allow for heat expansion as the gun gets hot. After the bolt has picked up the round and moved forwards into the chamber if the case head is seated back against the bolt face there will be slop in front of the case rim which means the round is probably not quite seated against the shoulder in the chamber...especially on a cold gun. There is quite a few thousandths of slop where an 8mm case will move in the T slot and that equates to a click or two on the headspace. Unfortunately, the front of the T slot ears hit the rear of the barrel and not the true bolt face that the cartridge head rests on. Because of this you can't truly measure and start at a point where the round is properly and firmly seated in the chamber and firmly in place back against the bolt face like on a bolt action gun....due to the slop the round may be seated or it may not be by a few thousandths.

Typically you would go 2 to 4 clicks out on the headspace adjustment after the bolt is locked up using 308 ammo in a 308 bolt. Because of the gap in the T slot with 8mm I only go one click out and see how the gun runs. One click is usually very tight, but with the slop it has proven in my guns to be dead on. If after the gun gets hot it starts to slow down or the bolt won't quite close then go out one or more clicks until it runs right.

At this point, with the 8mm Yugo I'm going to start running it at 0 clicks to start with just to see if it will run okay...there might be enough slop in the T slot for it to run good at 0. The tighter the headspace you can run the better.

Others may disagree with my opinion on using gages, but I've set them with a gage and then without and have found the gage to produce too loose of a headspace. I'm an engineer and love to go "by the book", but in this case "the book" isn't applcable with the way we're using a 308 bolt as a universal caliber bolt. If I were shooting 30-06 with a 30-06 bolt or 308 with a 308 bolt I would use the gage because that is the combination the gage was designd for and not for shooting 30-06 and 8mm that slop around in a 308 bolt.

I guess I'm on a crusade to try and prevent any more blown top covers using 8mm and the above headspacing practice is the means to my madness. Please forgive my pontificating.

My .02.
 
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