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PhD in Over-Engineering
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I can see about getting a pic of mine tomorrow. I think its an original. Now I am assuming this is the A4 booster tool you refer to. Don't have a drawing number reference handy.
 

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Don't have the dwg, check with Gatekeeper
 

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I have these if they help. One is a drawing - the other looks to be a home made one someone posted pics of awhile back?



 

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A picture of the "carbon removing reamer assembly 710640" appears in TM 9-1005-212-25, June 1969 page 89. I am not sure if that manual is under manuals on this site but I know it is on line someplace.
 

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PhD in Over-Engineering
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Armorer, just fyi, all posts in the Tech Forum require approval, which is my responsibility. I am not sure what the reasoning is for this, and I would just as soon have that requirement removed. This is the only forum on this board with that requirement. So I cleaned things up here for now. This forum generates activity only rarely, so unfortunately I don't always see new posts as timely as I would like. Sorry for the confusion.
 

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Can't say about the cost, but you screw the one piece booster on to the tool, hold it and turn the crank, the cutters scrape out the carbon. This tool was the downside to the one piece booster the two piece is much easier to clean.
 

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Any suggestions on other tools/methods to remove buildup if someone doesn't have one of these tools?
 

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PhD in Over-Engineering
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A 1 1/4" ball end mill works too. Also, a needle scaler works well, if you have compressed air available.
 

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Aditional Info

Hi Folks--

I developed some additional info on the carbon removal reaming assembly. The NSN for the tool is 4933-00-710-6460 Carbon Removing Reamer Assembly
Part Numbers are:
Housing - B7142192
screw - B7142194
cutter - A7142191
screw - MS51963-63
nut - bunx6,427352
pin- bfsx2. 1,587087
arm- A7142193
handle - A7142195

The CAGE# of the manufacturer is listed as Rock Island Arsenal 19204.
I hope this will help. I dropped Gatekeeper a line to see if she has any drawings or if she has access to DTIC to see if the drawings are on microfiche. I lost her email several months after my computer decided to take an early retirement.

Cheers

--fjruple
 

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I use an electric drill with a 1.25 in. wire wheel on an extension. Put boaster in a vise with a piece of leather as not to scratch it and go to town on it. Easy to use and cleans like crazy for cheap. Can get the parts at any Harbor Freight. FWIW.
 

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Any suggestions on other tools/methods to remove buildup if someone doesn't have one of these tools?
My kit came complete with a booster with a layer of carbon. I never thought about it until I fired it the first time and decided to clean it. A five minute project turned into an hour and a half. I started with the normal bore cleaner and kept coming up with more carbon. I tried a wire brush to loosen it up and I think I even used sand paper. I think I then put a bronze wire wheel on an electric drill before I got it all out. Obviously years of accumulation that no one thought to remove. I think if you clean it each time you shoot it it would not require that much work probably no more than a bronze wire tooth brush and bore cleaner.

Of course carbon fouling not only accumulates in the booster but well back in the jacket. Not a problem with noncorrosive ammo. The funny thing is we had BMGs in the National Guard (I believe six of them in my unit) and we never had the tool. But then we had A6 guns with chrome plated boosters. I don't recall them being harder to clean than wiping them out with bore cleaner on a cleaning patch.
 
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