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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all once again,

I understand one of the next ways to cleanup corrosive primers is to simply use soap and hot water. Cleaning the barrel/booster of the 1919 seems easy enough, but I’m more worried about the receiver. What are you cleaning up in the receiver after running corrosive ammo and what is your method for ensuring you don’t rust away components? How do you go about cleaning the walls of the receiver itself? As always thank you for your insights and wisdom!
 

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And to be mixed with water for corrosive ammo . Use that or just strip the receiver down and clean with soap and water . Bolt face too . Then use brake cleaner to get rid of the water , then oil it up .
Chris
 

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I wet the area with hot tap water and then wipe down, also I use a scraper for any carbon buildup. I use regular motor oil to lubricate any moving parts and surfaces where friction exists. Motor oil also works good on threads so they wont lock up.

I use same method on my S&W MP 15,Glock 35/27 patrol weapons. The bolt face on the AR gets alot of carbon build up and thats the only place where rock solid build up occurs. The rest of the areas get a sticky residue when carbon mixes with motor oil. I have roughly 30,000 rounds through this rifle and the only side effect so far has been widening gas ring. However using motor oil really helps because I will put 500 rounds through it and then brake it down and all of the affected areas still have very good lubricant on them. I did not experience that with Rem Oil, Hoppes, WD-40, CLP. They evaporate quickly with Rem Oil the fastest.

Now the Glock 35 has close to 50,000 rounds through it and I cant see anything starting to go out of factory tolerance. The 27 has maybe 10,000 through and its the same.

One more thing to add, weather. I have experienced great relief and pleasure when its 28 degrees outside and I chambered a round in the rifle thats been sitting in the trunk and it chambers correctly and everything locks up tight. I also had the rifle out searching for murder suspects in the rain for 45 minutes plus, the rifle is completely soaked, and once again I experienced great relief when in the end I make it cruiser safe and everything in it works even though its full of water. Same thing goes for Glock 35 which is exposed to the elements, and 27 although its covered by pant leg all the time.
 

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WHY in the world would you use one oxidizing agent (water) to neutralize another? Just spray it down liberally inside and out with carburetor cleaner (very cheap at Wal Mart) and then clean as usual. This way you don't have to worry about getting water out of every nook and cranny.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have been told water is the best because it removes the corrosive solvents by dissolving them since they’re hydroscopic. I figured I’d just use a can of air to dry out the nooks that I couldn’t reach.
 

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Salt is the problem...sodium is a basic element that you don't necessarily break down, you simply wash it away with water. This topic has been beaten to death, so everyone's own results may vary.

All I know is, I think its great entertainment when im outside in the yard and the neighbors walk by and are greeting with a hello and a waive while I'm out there with the garden hose and a rifle barrel.

When I shoot corrosive in my Sten it also gives me an incentive to do some dishes since its so easy to break it down and rinse it in the kitchen sink. Great entertainment, and it keeps people on their toes!
 

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What is funny is the looks we get at the car wash / U-Squirtem bay when we plop M2HB, M60s, 1919s 1917s receivers ( stripped ) etc on the tail gate and wash them out with the hot soapy car wash water . Qick rinse, ( their rinse is hot too) and they air dry quickly, We run them home for a good oiling. when I have a lot of guns from a shoot, it is the fastest way to clean out the crud. Barrels get a shot too and that is good to remove corrosive crap, but I end up scrubbing for weeks on the barrels anyway.
 

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What is funny is the looks we get at the car wash / U-Squirtem bay when we plop M2HB, M60s, 1919s 1917s receivers ( stripped ) etc on the tail gate and wash them out with the hot soapy car wash water . Qick rinse, ( their rinse is hot too) and they air dry quickly, We run them home for a good oiling. when I have a lot of guns from a shoot, it is the fastest way to clean out the crud. Barrels get a shot too and that is good to remove corrosive crap, but I end up scrubbing for weeks on the barrels anyway.
I love it! Thats a great idea for that amount of hosing off needed! Making a mental note for future reference!
 

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Every time this subject comes up I go nuts about it.
WHY in the world would you use one oxidizing agent (water) to neutralize another? Just spray it down liberally inside and out with carburetor cleaner (very cheap at Wal Mart) and then clean as usual. This way you don't have to worry about getting water out of every nook and cranny.
Because the water washes away the harmful salts, and the oil you use next washes away the water. Ive been advocating a mild ammonia/water wipedown here for years. I mean theres only like 23 billion surplus guns out there with good bores......you dont need anything more than a neutralizing wipe (water or ammonia) and oil.

Carb cleaner strips parkerizing of its protective oils and leaves metal totally exposed.
 

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What is funny is the looks we get at the car wash / U-Squirtem bay when we plop M2HB, M60s, 1919s 1917s receivers ( stripped ) etc on the tail gate and wash them out with the hot soapy car wash water . Qick rinse, ( their rinse is hot too) and they air dry quickly, We run them home for a good oiling. when I have a lot of guns from a shoot, it is the fastest way to clean out the crud. Barrels get a shot too and that is good to remove corrosive crap, but I end up scrubbing for weeks on the barrels anyway.
I bet that turns heads lol.
 

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I shoot very corrosive 54r blanks in a few beltfeds and simply use Windex with ammonia to clean them out - works great and dries fast. A light oil after it's dry and back into the safe. Don't forget the most commonly used solvent to break down black powder residue is hot water - I've boiled boosters in hot water to help break the corrosion down.
 

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Every time this subject comes up I go nuts about it.

Because the water washes away the harmful salts, and the oil you use next washes away the water. Ive been advocating a mild ammonia/water wipedown here for years. I mean theres only like 23 billion surplus guns out there with good bores......you dont need anything more than a neutralizing wipe (water or ammonia) and oil.

Carb cleaner strips parkerizing of its protective oils and leaves metal totally exposed.
And what does water do in the nooks and crannies if you don't get it all? (Rust). You can easily re-oil your parkerizing after cleaning. (easier to re-oil the outside of the gun rather than getting all the water in the nooks and crannies. ) Used it for years now on all my corrosive ammo using guns. No problems.
 

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And what does water do in the nooks and crannies if you don't get it all? (Rust). You can easily re-oil your parkerizing after cleaning. (easier to re-oil the outside of the gun rather than getting all the water in the nooks and crannies. ) Used it for years now on all my corrosive ammo using guns. No problems.
You know to re-oil after using carb cleaner.....lots of guys dont. They store them bone dry. I cant tell you how many M2's and M249's have rusted bbls and receivers because guys are cleaning them with carb cleaner. I see it all the time. I dont advocate a full water bath after corrosive ammo, just a damp rag (water and ammonia mix) for a wipe down.
 

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I actually just use a standard auto parts cleaner tank from Horror Freight with their in stock cleaner solution. And those that know me know I only use old corrosive 8mm in my A4 since 1989. I don’t worry much about the barrels because they don’t last more than a couple shoots. I just ram a steel brush on a cordless drill up the chamber for a couple minutes before I start shooting to scrape anything growing in there and let it rip, tater chip.
 

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CalBAR - when I use hot water I mean boiling hot - the key to using it is to get the metal hot enough that the water evaporates from all of those nooks and crannies. Otherwise cold clean is Windex with ammonia.
 
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