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This story shows the importance of 1) Always point the firearm in a safe direction and 2) check the chamber before cleaning. This is a very sad story that just popped up in my home town here in Ocala fl. Which I am sure those of you live in Florida might have heard about it. Here is the link http://www.clickorlando.com/news/ocala-police-officer-dies-after-accidental-shooting/32217844
EVERY time I hear this 'accidental discharge' stuff, it pisses me off. Learn to clear your damn weapon!!!! Guns dont just fire! They fire when guys drop their magazines and dont clear their slides, and then pull the trigger for some stupid reason. This is a tragic story that was totally avoidable.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
EVERY time I hear this 'accidental discharge' stuff, it pisses me off. Learn to clear your damn weapon!!!! Guns dont just fire! They fire when guys drop their magazines and dont clear their slides, and then pull the trigger for some stupid reason. This is a tragic story that was totally avoidable.
I agree 100% with you ScottD
 

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Many of us have had an AD. Thankfully mine only ended up with a hole in my basement block wall and some shrapnel in the ceiling.

Be careful folks.

R
 

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Mine put a hole right in the heart of a malevolent mirror in our hallway. NEVER come back from a week of training on handguns and "try out" your presentation in front of a mirror thinking you can control your trigger finger. Not after 1,500 rounds in five days and two nights. That finger has a mind of its own.

Also in a training scenario several years later, the day is done and twenty of us are taking turns field stripping, cleaning and reassembling our firearms at five cleaning stations. I'm about done with mine when I hear seven deafening reports from the next booth in line. Turns out the guy on that station got his 1911 cleaned and back together, rammed a magazine home and racked the slide. It went full auto and dumped the mag. My side of the divider between stations had seven lumps and his side had seven dimples. Up until about six months before the stations had been divided by lines of masking tape on the table. The training captain had decided that was unsafe and had steel plate dividers put up. I could have kissed her (and she was one unattractive woman).
 

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I lost my neighbor to an accidental discharge at the hand of his only son last fall. His widow is still in terrible shape.

Karl
 

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xdevildog SEZ: :....five days and two nights" --nnhow do you do dat?

Carry On!
Gary
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Mine put a hole right in the heart of a malevolent mirror in our hallway. NEVER come back from a week of training on handguns and "try out" your presentation in front of a mirror thinking you can control your trigger finger. Not after 1,500 rounds in five days and two nights. That finger has a mind of its own.

Also in a training scenario several years later, the day is done and twenty of us are taking turns field stripping, cleaning and reassembling our firearms at five cleaning stations. I'm about done with mine when I hear seven deafening reports from the next booth in line. Turns out the guy on that station got his 1911 cleaned and back together, rammed a magazine home and racked the slide. It went full auto and dumped the mag. My side of the divider between stations had seven lumps and his side had seven dimples. Up until about six months before the stations had been divided by lines of masking tape on the table. The training captain had decided that was unsafe and had steel plate dividers put up. I could have kissed her (and she was one unattractive woman).

How did he manage that?
 

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Thanks for the "be freakin careful" reminder. Remembering my accidental discharge incident still gives me shivers.
 

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Gents - it's time to call it what it is - a negligent discharge. nothing accidental about not following safety procedures. Sure it happens - I am guilty myself. Fortunately it usually only has to happen once and you learn quickly. At least I hope so.
 

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xdevildog SEZ: :....five days and two nights" --nnhow do you do dat?

Carry On!
Gary
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Five daylight shoots on several ranges and shoot houses of about eight hours each and two night shoots, one indoor and one outdoor of about four hours each. All run in the same five day week.
 

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How did he manage that?
I'm have no idea. This was before my gunsmith days. Best the investigation could come up with is that the the sear/hammer engagement was out of spec and the firing pin was jammed forward, at least on the first shot. Subsequent shots were slam fires aided by the shooter instinctively gripping the weapon and probably pressing the trigger throughout. He admitted his finger was in the trigger bow, but claimed not to have pressed the trigger. This was a series 70 weapon.

Now that I work on 1911's I wonder just how it happened, too. The shooter got some time off without pay and orders to purchase a new sidearm. Apparently his Dad had carried it on the job, too, so it had sentimental value. I was offered a half day off and psychological counseling - again. Seemed to get that a lot. :confused:
 

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1911s have gone "full auto" quite often. Lots of indoor military ranges in the old days had a line of holes in the ceilings. Worn sear is the most usual suspect. All it takes is a loaded magazine inserted, and rack the slide. no trigger pull is needed. I have only seen it once. Now, Negligent discharges are way to common. I was Director of an organization with about 700-800 armed response people. We had several "NDs". None occurred when guns were left loaded and setting on a shelf, rack or holster. In fact, I have NEVER seen a loaded gun just "fire by itself". I have seen loaded M-16s, 45s, SIGs and HK USPs kicked, Dropped, thrown, run over, and fall from three decks up and none of those "fired" either. But EVERY FRICKEN time a loaded weapon had it's trigger pulled when it should not have been , the gun went off. I could fill up a page with stories of how these happened. Everyone of these events was preventable.
Now, I personally killed a dresser in the bedroom many years ago, when I loaded a 1911a1 I was carrying. inserted mag, racked slide and the pistol went off. I cannot say to this day whether my finger was on the trigger, it shocked me so bad. But to this day, I do not use a 1911 as a carry gun.
Glocks are great pistols, BUT they require a user to strictly adhere to procedure when unloading and dis-assembling . The failure is in not removing magazine and then clearing the chamber. When the trigger is depressed to dis assemble, the pistol fires ......
 

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When I was young kid maybe 15 or 16 I took a single shot 16 gage shotgun into the back yard to try to shoot some kind of nasty thing like a rat or mole or who knows what. I was always careful to unload a gun before bringing it into the house but this time I was sure I had unloaded it and just for the hell of it I pointed it at a picture on the living room wall. As I was about to pull the trigger I thought no maybe check the chamber first. Sure enough it was loaded. I put that shotgun away and didn't touch it for two weeks. I can only imagine what would have happened had I pulled that trigger. All that gun safety training down the drain. No more gun collecting until I left home if even then, maybe the cops called who knows. I still break out in a cold sweat when I think about that time and I have never brought a loaded gun into a house or hunting cabin since. I then realized what they meant when someone shot someone and claimed they didn't know the gun was loaded. I always obey the range safety rules even if they seem a little silly some times.

I have noticed when showing guns to young people, if there are more than one of them they invariably fool around and point them at each other. That's something I have never done as a kid and shows that their parents never taught them anything about gun safety. I never point even a partly disassembled gun at anyone.
 

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Mine put a hole right in the heart of a malevolent mirror in our hallway. NEVER come back from a week of training on handguns and "try out" your presentation in front of a mirror thinking you can control your trigger finger. Not after 1,500 rounds in five days and two nights. That finger has a mind of its own.

Also in a training scenario several years later, the day is done and twenty of us are taking turns field stripping, cleaning and reassembling our firearms at five cleaning stations. I'm about done with mine when I hear seven deafening reports from the next booth in line. Turns out the guy on that station got his 1911 cleaned and back together, rammed a magazine home and racked the slide. It went full auto and dumped the mag. My side of the divider between stations had seven lumps and his side had seven dimples. Up until about six months before the stations had been divided by lines of masking tape on the table. The training captain had decided that was unsafe and had steel plate dividers put up. I could have kissed her (and she was one unattractive woman).

There was an article in the NRA magazine years ago about M1911 pistols going full auto. It turns out it is the result of broken disconnector. It seems if the shooter is in the habit of holding the trigger back when letting the slide go forward in dry firing it will cause strain on that particular part. I am sure someone else has more information on this.
 

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It scares the hell out of me at a gun show to see the lack of gun safety practiced by some dealers and customers. We assume that all guns are empty but what if one got loaded by some sick idiot. Ammo is always around so it could happen.
I always assume a gun is loaded until I check. I would like to see the clubs do more gun safety at the shows. Great time to teach the younger crowd.
When I was a kid many moons ago, my brother slammed a 12 ga shut and it discharged very close to our feet. Jumped us so much we stopped using it until we got to a gunsmith.
Steamer
 

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teaching!

I have always tried to teach my girls to always double check every gun you pick up, your,mine or anybody, and never touch a trigger till you have double checked the chamber, when we are getting ready to leave the range I double check every gun before it gets loaded into the truck, I was scowled at the other day for handing a shotgun to a visitor while it still had rounds in the tube, the chamber was empty but it had 5 in the tube,I told him," an unloaded weapon is a club", I guess it would be safer to unload the tube as well.
 

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Negligent Discharge is definitely a better descriptor of the action involved. Mine was absolutely my fault. I pulled the trigger.
 

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Negligent Discharge in Virginia = Class 1 Misdemeanor


Carry On!
Gary
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