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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know the regulation powder storage is a pine cabinet, but is it safe to store powder and primers in ammo cans,I was given a couple of the large cans, about 24 inches tall X 8 wide, they hold a lot of stuff and they still have a good seal, plus the double handle make them easier to move around,I figure if they are good enough for the military to store ammo they should work for ammo components! And where I live the humidity is so low I don't think I have to worry about moisture getting trapped in the cans. How about storing the primers and powder in the same cans? Somehow that just doesn't sound like a good idea?
I do have a wooden cabinet that I store powders in but it's not big enough to store powders that I have bought for just storage,I keep the powders that I use most often in the wood cabinet, but after that last bout of powder shortage, I still can't find any blue dot, I don't want to get caught empty handed again, not that I actually ran out completely, but it was too close, plus the prices are much higher now that it's back!
My reloading room isn't in my house,it's in a trailer that I use as my hobby room, so the flammabilty factor isn't as scary, plus I think the fire marshal would be a little less paranoid,I watched our local fire department let a house burn to the ground because the guy had ammo and components stored in his house so I'm trying to do everything I can to be as safe as possible.
 

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...correct...

Agree...and have to remind folks about it all the time. Same logic applies to putting stuff in a safe. Ammo in ammo cans. Primers and powder are best kept in their original containers. That is why they are packaged and shipped that way to begin with. I have powder from the factory in #26, #33 and #44 containers. They are stored in a separate location than my primer stock...on a different level and another room. Remember...a package of 100-primers has the explosive power of about a 1/4 stick of dynamite. As long as powder is keep from direct sunlight and dry...it will last a very long time without any deterioration. I have used some Bullseye ...kept in the original red 6# can...that was at least 50-yrs old...without any problems.
 

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Bob, if you want to store bulk powder very long term use plastic five gallon food grade buckets with snap on lids. You can usually get them at the Lowe's in St. George. Toss in a half dozen oxygen absorbing pouches from the storehouse/cannery, making sure the packets don't rest directly on the raw powder. Put the buckets in a cool, dry and dark place and your girls will be using that powder long after you and I are gone.
 

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Agree with all the above - static E will set off either one - do not store powder and primers together or in metal cans. the original trays for primers are plastic for reason. DO NOT dump them loose into a can or together in bulk. If you want some fun, take a 1 lb can of powder, pour it out and set it afire - from many feet away. You can do it with a simple electric arc off two wires and a 9 V. But now we are getting into improvised triggers, and that is how you lose hands if not careful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
storage

I left the powder and primers in their original containers, the powder bottles are sealed from the factory so I assumed that should last a long time.
The only time I ever had powder outside it's original container was when I found an old guy at a yard sale who had a couple of kegs of 4831, he didn't want to sell the old fiber board kegs but would sell the powder, my wife bought a bunch of canning jars from him so we filled the canning jars with powder for $1 each,I was scarred spitless on the trip home, as soon as I got home I transferred it all into plastic one gallon jugs and some WW2 aluminum powder cans, never had a problem with any of it.
 

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Bob, if you want to store bulk powder very long term use plastic five gallon food grade buckets with snap on lids. You can usually get them at the Lowe's in St. George. Toss in a half dozen oxygen absorbing pouches from the storehouse/cannery, making sure the packets don't rest directly on the raw powder. Put the buckets in a cool, dry and dark place and your girls will be using that powder long after you and I are gone.
Why would you use an "oxygen absorber" when moisture is the potential problem? Smokeless powder has its own oxidizers so an absorber is NOT the answer.

You want to use a desiccant (either clay based or silica gel based) to absorb any moisture.

Oxygen absorbers are for food, not for smokeless powder.
 

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Why would you use an "oxygen absorber" when moisture is the potential problem? Smokeless powder has its own oxidizers so an absorber is NOT the answer.

You want to use a desiccant (either clay based or silica gel based) to absorb any moisture.

Oxygen absorbers are for food, not for smokeless powder.
Habit. . . . .
 

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Agree with all the above - static E will set off either one - do not store powder and primers together or in metal cans. the original trays for primers are plastic for reason. DO NOT dump them loose into a can or together in bulk. If you want some fun, take a 1 lb can of powder, pour it out and set it afire - from many feet away. You can do it with a simple electric arc off two wires and a 9 V. But now we are getting into improvised triggers, and that is how you lose hands if not careful.
That reminds me of being in a mortar platoon in the 70's. The 81's used nine charge bags tied to the fin area of the projectile. The fire mission might call for only a charge 3 so the extras were pulled off and placed in an ammo crate. After the days firing the bags were spread out along a dirt road in a long line. We then set one end of the line on fire and backed away quick. The powder in the bags looked like flake shot gun powder but it was labeled Comp B.
 

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That reminds me of being in a mortar platoon in the 70's. The 81's used nine charge bags tied to the fin area of the projectile. The fire mission might call for only a charge 3 so the extras were pulled off and placed in an ammo crate. After the days firing the bags were spread out along a dirt road in a long line. We then set one end of the line on fire and backed away quick. The powder in the bags looked like flake shot gun powder but it was labeled Comp B.
Yes, same with fixed ammo on the 105mm Howitzers. During the fire mission, one of the gun crew would hold the extra charges in hand a little back from the rear of the piece as the OX or FDO checked the settings(deflection and quadrant) with his gunner's quadrant. Once the round was fired, he'd toss them into the pit to be burned.

All the extra charge bags were tossed well rear of the piece in a small dug pit and the XO or the FDO would go to each piece, count up what should be there according to the number of rounds fired by that piece and their charges, then light them up in a line.
 
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