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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone looked into a substitute for the disks that would offer better protection than the fiber disks? There has to something better in the almost 100 years since it was first created, I was thinking of something like car tire rubber cut into disks or some synthetic hard rubber cylinder to replace the disks.
 

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Actually, with all the 1919s around, maybe Buffer Tech will start making buffers???
 

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I believe this stuff should work just fine. Its about the same consistancy as the GI buffer discs. Its used for wear plating in chutes and hoppers. I've used it for glue on shoes for lame horses and it worked really well. I dont know if its expensive or not, I used to "liberate " it from power plants I worked at.

http://www.sdplastics.com/uhmw.html
 

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buffers

I know a guy that took a whamo super ball cut it into pieces and made buffers of that NOTE....he says use more than 4 and the rate of fire Increases alot in full auto........;)
 

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And of course you can replace every other disc with a pre-1943 quarter for increased rate of fire.........
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Roc Rat said:
Actually, with all the 1919s around, maybe Buffer Tech will start making buffers???
Good Idea maybe we can put in a request to see if they will do it.:)
 

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SRT has 1 piecers for $25......
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all the replys and last night I sent a email to BufferTech but I won't hold my breath and I will check out SRT as I did not relize anyone was makin any sort of after market buffer for them-Thanks guys
 

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buffer disks

i made some for mine using canvas phenolic. works just fine. tomt
 

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The discs in my 1919 were hard and red, kinda felt like a stack of wooden nickles. Cannot figure out how it offers any sort of shock resistance. Neatest thing I had seen on the subject was a guy at Knob Creek that had a prototype for another gun. It was basically a stack of washers seperated by a stack of smaller OD rubber washers. He called it some sort of solid spring. When compressed the rubber parts can compress outwards and inwards and have much more elasticity than a solid "rubber" piece. Seemed like a very good idea.
 

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Dear MacGuyver, Enclosed is a rubber band, a paper clip, and a drinking straw.

People will think of anything to improve on a simple idea !!!!:D :D
 

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I can't think of another part on the 1919 whose function I would be more concerned with than the buffer. With 11 pounds of recoiling parts there's a lot going on inside the receiver, and the force the recoiling bolt is considerable. I would hope that the one-piece buffer has been properly engineered for its task, and I would certainly give a LOT of thought to it before I started second guessing the considerable engineering that went into the GI buffer and used quarters or super balls in it. Anything works until it doesn't, and having an emergency room doc dig a backplate out of your forehead is not an outcome any of us are looking for. For any of you who may not be familiar with what a malfunction can do, this might be worth a look:
http://www.liberatorcrew.com/Malfunctions.htm

No sense courting trouble. There is a system that is proven to work. Why not use it?
Jon
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Nosegunner said:
No sense courting trouble. There is a system that is proven to work. Why not use it?
Jon
Hey Jon
I'm just looking for something better to protect my build, I do have the same concerns that what ever I put in there will not be as good and I do more damage than good. But one thing for sure I did not expect the amount of post for this subject.:cool: Thanks everyone!:D
 

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I have had the same concerns as "Nosegunner" with the nylon/delrin/plastic cylinder used in my Spade Grips I purchased from ORF. I removed the plastic piece and replaced it with the correct aomount of Buffer Discs. I don't know if it was worth the cost, but I felt better anyway!

I don't know what the Buffer Disc material is, but it appears to be a cloth base disc. If I still have access to a lab, i would cut one and find out what it is made of, what the hardness is and how compressable it is. With this type information, a modern substitute could be specified. I feel the important part is the compressability of the material is the key.
 

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blkbd:
Posting here for ideas is absolutely the right thing to do. You never know when a topic starts where it will lead, and what useful info will come of it. Buffering a bolt is tricky business. Most buffers on the market for other weapons, such as the AR-15 or the AK-47, increase the buffer's effectiveness. The idea of potentially reducing it is worth a conversation. There is always a chance that someone new to the 1919 might not have enough experience or knowledge to know better, and end up hurting someone. Personally I don't begin to have the engineering chops to know what might be a safe substitute, which is why I put my faith in the military's SOP.

There is a short buffered backplate for the fixed 1919 which uses fewer disks than the flexible gun. That might suggest that the larger number of fiber disks is not necessary. Anyone know anything about that?
 

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Nosegunner:
Thanks for the copy of that TM.

I'd heard or read somewhere that when the buffering action decreases and begins beating the receiver too bad that ONE of the buffer discs can be changed out with a quarter (twenty-five cent piece) -- but was that when a quarter was SILVER or a newer CUPRO-NICKLE one??? And, does it matter? Don' fool around with that stuff!!!

As for "figure 28" -- anyone knows that can be fixed with duct tape!

CARRY on!
Gary
 

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We also have to remember that these guns were designed around what was available at the time. We have come a long way since then in respects to engineering and product development. Plastics isn't what it was back then. I'm sure a hard shore durometer polyurethane would do the trick.

I think first, someone needs to see how far the disks actually compress during firing. This shouldn't be too hard to check. Simply place some modeling clay or something on the backplate next to the plunger and fire. Remove the back plate and measure the difference between the plunger and the now compressed modeling clay. Repeat when trying a new buffer material to make sure you aren't beating your bolt and backplate to death. just my .02
 

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You know, a good spring that is properly designed would work for a Buffer Disc replacement. What is needed is the force from the bolt as it hits the recoil plate, how far the recoil plate can travel to stop the Bolt before it contacts the Backplate, and the inside diameter of the Buffer Tube. With this, the calculation would not be difficlut to come up with the specs for a spring.

I sure would hate to have to compress the spring and have it slip......the firing spring would be childs play compared to the force the recoild spring would have. But, this also could be a spring assembly that would drop in place. The only problem with this is the number that could/would be sold as the cost would be expensive.

As "Sydwaiz" stated "these guns were designed around what was available at the time".

Edit - OK guys, here is an example of what I was talking about for a a shock buffer to replace the discs. Take a look at this website: http://www.enidine.com/Platmain.html?src=overture&OVRAW=shock absorber assembly&OVKEY=shock absorbent&OVMTC=advanced
 
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