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Discussion Starter #1
I tried searching here and google, with little luck or info.

Has anyone had any first hand experience at suppressing a 1919? I want to try to be courteous to the neighbors where I shoot and be comfortable when shooting. Form 1's (homemade) suppressors are super fast and easy with the ATF on-line forms. I have an approved Form 1 for a .308 can. I just want to do it right the first time. Can will be stainless steel, so no problems with semiauto durability.
My question is, what issues did you encounter? I cut the barrel down to 16.5" and had it threaded by ADCO. The weight of the cut off section equals the additional weight of the suppressor. Will the suppressor supply the back pressure of the booster?

Thanks
Chris
 

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Would not the suppressor be attached to the jacket itself, and replicate the booster's function?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Suppressor attached to the barrel to ensure no baffle strikes/tight fit. Barrel jacket will still be there, but not in a supportive function...unless it is necessary. If it does need the support, I will machine a brass sleeve i guess.
 

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Umm- Pretty sure you would need some sort of support at the end of the barrel - it will droop depending on tolerances in the trunnion and barrel extension. Question is will the gun cycle. Back pressure is meaningless on the 1919, it is recoil operated. the booster does just that- boosts the recoil. you are eliminating the boost. Pull the booster off and see how much the barrel droops. Try firing it without the booster. Let us know what you
 

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Discussion Starter #5
That's what I'm trying to figure out. How much does the suppressor add to the recoil since it does trap some of the gas? Allowing the suppressor to ride in a brass sleeve for support is definitely an option and something I figured would be necessary due to the weight of the barrel. I will definitely keep ya posted and document the journey.
I do know that when going from full length to shorty (16") barrel requires a change from .308 to .30-06 booster, so it is a factor. Now I just have to figure our how much of a factor.
 

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The suppressor on the barrel will add zero to the recoil since there is nothing for it to recoil against. Back pressure means nothing since the 1919 is not gas operated. as weight, it will reduce the recoil energy by increasing the mass that is recoiling. Perhaps other have done this already and can comment -
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The gas in the suppressor is pushing back on the barrel? I dunno. that's why I am asking.
 

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Years ago I was able to handle the post-sample MG-15 that WLA made and brought out to Knob Creek.
Looking at the picture you can see that the entire jacket was replaced to create the suppressor.
The original MG-15 also has a bearing and booster cup at the muzzle.
It will "carbon up" and seize IF you don't clean it after firing!
I wish I had more details about how the suppressor was made and functioned.
I do know that it worked.

Richard

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Discussion Starter #9
I am trying to do all the background work to make it function. However, I am fortunate to be close in location to a 1919 pro, www.ironcreations.com. Not sure how long it will take me to wear our my welcome, but I am hoping Jeff and I can figure it out. I have the 1919 and form 1, just depends on his schedule.
 

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I would think the suppressor would need to be mounted to the jacket, and the inner diameter of the baffles to get the pressure right. I recall seeing an article a while back where someone had sucessfully done this. To answer your question, yes the backpressure in the booster assembly is required to cycle the gun. A supressor added to the barrel would not add any pressure to help cycle the action.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
So a booster (Nielson device) like handgun suppressors with a HD spring? This is exactly the discussion I am looking for.
 

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Suppressor attached to the barrel to ensure no baffle strikes/tight fit. Barrel jacket will still be there, but not in a supportive function...unless it is necessary. If it does need the support, I will machine a brass sleeve i guess.
Get a 2 piece A4 booster and weld a female threaded adapter to the front of the booster plug. Design your can with a male threaded end to screw into the booster plug female adapter. Buy several plugs so you experiment with different orifice diameters to get the pressures right for correct cycling. What design and material are you going to use for the inner baffles of the can?
 

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The gas in the suppressor is pushing back on the barrel? I dunno. that's why I am asking.
No. Have you looked at the gun ? If you screw a suppressor on the end of the barrel, the suppressor can't "push" on the barrel. ( the barrel is 1.25" dia full length) The action of the 1919 recoils rearward, and the accelertor in the innards assists . The booster on the gun provides additional "boost" rearward to overcome the weight of the heavy barrel and operate the belt feed ( termed as belt lift) Adding a Weight on the heavy barrel increases recoiling weight, reduces the energy available. The front of the barrel is supported by the bearing. Take the booster off your gun and observe how much the barrel droops. This should give you an idea of the amount of support needed. I am sure there is a solution, but it would seem we need more input -
 

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That's what I'm trying to figure out. How much does the suppressor add to the recoil since it does trap some of the gas? Allowing the suppressor to ride in a brass sleeve for support is definitely an option and something I figured would be necessary due to the weight of the barrel. I will definitely keep ya posted and document the journey.
I do know that when going from full length to shorty (16") barrel requires a change from .308 to .30-06 booster, so it is a factor. Now I just have to figure our how much of a factor.
I shoot my shorty barrel, 14" in my semi with the 7.62 booster with no issues.
 

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I'd swear I just answered this a week or two back. I've built number of suppressors for the 1919's and they work very well. One went to new hampshire to an owner who was told he couldn't shoot his MGs at the private range anymore. They were tired of the cops getting called everytime someone fired an MG. WIth the suppressor no one knew he was shooting so no more trouble with the range folks.
My suppressor replaces the booster and the barrel needs to be reduced in diameter because while the 1919 is said to be recoil operated it is also gas operated through the booster. My first prototype setup boosted the rate of fire to about 1000rpm. Too high for reliability and life of parts in the 1919. Reduce the muzzle diameter and choke the suppressor inlet and the rate comes down nicely. You can't really cover the whole jacket or your booster won't work right.

My prototype started to expand after about 350rds fired continuously and I managed to get off the trigger before something popped. This was of course a machinegun and not a semi. Subsequent cans had a reinforcement in the initial expansion chamber to prevent the likely hood of a split or damage to the can from an overzealous shooter. Stainless can be a good material but pick the grade wisely. Some types will work harden with heat cycling and your welds will crack. If your 1919 is a semi you should have no problems. If its a machinegun use care as heat builds quickly and not many materials hold up when the temps go up.

found the previous thread....it was a maxim / vickers suppressor thread but there is 1919 stuff there too.....


Frank
 

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Frank has some great experience and input here. Thanks for that. I was going to suggest that one way to overcome the recoil issue for cycling purposes is the reduce the barrel weight. This would increase the chances of overheating the barrel, but in a semi that may not matter unless you are looking to do a lot of rapid fire. You could use a shortened barrel jacket with a bearing set back from the muzzle, leaving exposed barrel to attach a suppressor, if you are determined to do it that way. It is worth mentioning that the original issue 1919A6 did not have a booster, and it did run. The only shortcoming was that it lacked belt lift. It ran, just with far less muscle than the A4, and that with a significantly lighter barrel profile. So, you may be able to make it work.

I don't intend to volunteer Jeff Prater for anything, lol, but he may have the ability to make a jacket of the length you need. If you want to retain the 24" barrel, something just a couple of inches shorter than stock on the jacket might work. Or, you could even use a 1919A6 jacket and a custom bearing for that. In either case, you will need to do some barrel work, between profiling and threading.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
16.5" barrel threaded by ADCO. I have a lathe to take off weight as needed. will definitely be a trial and error method to find the right balance between weight and gas.
 

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That is an interesting article even if its way off. Mine were done back around 2005 if I recall correctly and I have a feeling mine weren't the first. Not that tough of a gun to suppress so don't get too complicated. Taking lots of weight off the barrel and then attaching the can directly doesn't do any better than replacing the booster with a can and turning the barrel diameter down for about 2 inches at the muzzle. Use the same fit tolerance as the booster to the standard barrel just reduce the barrel diameter to about .875" and the bore of the back end of the can to match at around .890". Cut some shallow grooves in the muzzle end of the barrel to act as labyrinth seals an carbon scrapers. Works great. The blow by noise level is much lower then the action noise.
However do it as you like. There are many ways to peel a cat. The only problem is that you end up with a peeled cat in the end and only the chinese seem to be able to cook the damn things so they don't taste like dead cat.

Keep us posted and pics would be nice.

Frank
 

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Discussion Starter #20
You are being very gracious and kind and only pointing out that it is way off. Definitely not a guide....no info, and for the last 4 years, nothing new from the company. dismal. I will try a shot at my ideas and share it.
 
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