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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am terrible about cleaning guns. Sure all the corrosive ammo guns get bathed after every shoot but I’m still not good at it.

I have a postie 74 in 5.45x39. Tried to use a .22 cal Dewey rod with a patch and the patch would not go. So aparently the wrong size.

what tools do you swear by? What makes the process easier and faster?


maybe a photo of the area you use for cleaning?
 

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Compressed air is a must for getting debris out of hard to reach areas.
A sonic cleaner of any size ( I have a hornady 2L but they make a 9L) takes any hard work out if cleaning. The 2L easily fits 1919 internals, vickers feed block, lock etc. etc.
As for the bore, hard to beat a pull through but sometimes with excessive build up a proper cal bore brush is needed. I end with a soaked and finally dry patch to make sure I got it all.
Hoppes No 9 can double as cologne, too. 😆
 

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yeah, what I use to clean the bore of my AK-74 is the cleaning rod that came with it......it's the correct size, and use the cleaning kit that is stored in the buttstock. you can find those just about anywhere for cheap.
East German RG 74 Cleaning Kit for AK-74 (libertytreecollectors.com)


as for my other guns, I just use a standard cleaning kit, sectioned cleaning rods, the correct size brushes, a rag and BRAKE FREE (CLP), for the nooks and crannies I can't get to conventionally, I just blast it with BREAK CLEANER

you're welcome glad, to be of help :)
 

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What size patch were you using?
 

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For cleaning patches I use the rolls of flannelette that IMA use to sell for the British .303 guns with the red or blue lines designating patch size. I just cut on the lines for each patch, and it covers most calibers. Can cut a little smaller for .223 weapons.
 

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Sonic cleaners are great. For cleaning hammer/trigger assemblies of Mini-14s and AC-556s a sonic cleaner works great. But from experience, never ever place an aluminum item in a sonic cleaner. I ruined the finish on a Vector Uzi .22lr bolt using one. From what I can tell a sonic standing wave formed in my bolt and everywhere the standing wave came to the surface the finish was removed and a scar in the metal appeared on the surface. Be warned!
 
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#1 and only is Carb. cleaner. Like gun scrubber but MUCH cheaper. Great for flushing corrosive salts. I buy it by the carton.
 

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Rory you’re patch is probably too big. A Dewey rod and a 22 jig and a 22 patch will fit. A 308ish patch won’t come close to making it in there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
For those asking, it was a really small thin patch. Got them in bulk years ago and no labeling remaining.

but this is kind of about everything in general. I know some people really enjoy the cleaning process. It’s time I’d rather devote to anything else.
 

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I know how you can cut your cleaning time to zilch, don't shoot.......... then you can "devote your time to anything else"

you're welcome, glad to be of help :D
 

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UGH, slowfire, you aint no fun!! We have 40 degrees and wind, only reason I aint shooting today is that the local deer hunters are practicing today for tomorrows opening day and I would have a driveway full of them wanting a turn.........!!!!!

Rory, sounds like carb cleaner is the way to go. Easy to use for most everything, lots of waste, but......part of it. Since carbs are almost a thing of the past, I will have to check in my local NAPA and see if they have any. My two existing cans are almost dry.

PJH
 

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40-degree temps???? man you are having a heat wave where you are, it's been snowing here since sat, with temp below freezing and with the wind it was 24 degrees.

I might have to pull out my long-johns out of storage :D
 

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Like you @Rory, I dislike cleaning guns. I make it as easy as possible. I clean the barrel then clean the receiver and internals.

Carb cleaner is getting expensive. Use brake parts cleaner. Un-chlorinated. Auto Zone and Pep Boys have it on sale frequently for $2.99 a can. NAPA is usually $8+ a can. :rolleyes: Buy everything on the shelf when its on sale. The thing to keep in mind with carb cleaner and brake parts cleaner is that it completely removes all oils from the metal so you MUST re-oil after cleaning with it. To re-oil after cleaning, I created a mix of Mobil 1 and denatured alcohol (80/20% ratio) in a spray bottle. The denatured alcohol thins the oil so you can spray it, then the denatured alcohol evaporates leaving behind the oil.

No pictures of my cleaning area. But I do it in my side yard, the brake parts cleaner is overwhelming if used indoors and will linger for days. I also use a plastic topped folding table (Cosco table from Costco) because they are impervious to the brake parts cleaner.

For Barrel cleaning
Dewey cleaning rods. Long 308 caliber and a long 22 caliber covers all MGs and rifles.
Dewey 'pusher' cleaning jags in 308 and 22 caliber
Pro Shot or Dewey bore brushes
Pro Shot cleaning patches bought in 500+ counts (Amazon)
Hoppes #9
CLP

For cleaning the rest of any MG or rifle
Aerosol Brake Parts cleaner
Old toothbrushes
Pro Shot 45 caliber cleaning patches
CLP
Re-coat with 80% Mobil 1 / 20% denatured alcohol in a spray bottle. Spray entire firearm, let soak in, wipe down.
Oil all moving parts as normal


For pistols I don't use the brake parts cleaner, I clean entirely by hand using only cleaning patches and CLP.

Hope this helps.
 

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If you find yourself wanting to try a small ultrasonic cleaner, the 2.5 liter from Harbor Freight is same one Lyman sells (or at least used to be). Only thing I've ever bought from HF that actually worked and wasn't a POS!
 

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The issue with taking out alot of guns shooting is there are more to clean. I used to only take out about five or so.

Long time ago my buddy upgraded his shop and shared a large commercial compressor with the auto mechanic. Once they hooked up a air dryer and filters that took the water moisture out, that was the ticket. High volume compressed air. Cleaning his guns I quickly saw how much of a gun cleaning multiplier that was as there is alot of them. Well, I dont have the space or wanted to get into a compressor so I tried a leaf blower. That worked very well in comparison but it was impossible to hold the long blower and the parts at the same time and the parts just shot off the table. I found a Craftsman 16 gallon wet dry vac detachable blower leaf blower compact and short handle and it can use a short pointed nozzle. At about 110 miles an hour 6.8 hp peak 20 amp circuit it puts out a serious volume of air and the bonus is that it doesn't have any of the moisture in it like a compressor does.

Get a first swabbing of all barrels several times. Break down all guns or as many as you can handle the internals in bins. Soak the internal parts in Hoppes until you can clean them later. Now its time to work the receivers spray down and brush and bring it outside and hit it with the blower. All the gunk comes out and rag it off, on to the next. Once you have all the receivers finished, I start to detail the barrels with rods. Once all of that is done its time for the internals to get broke down and detailed. Reassemble.
I do use WD40 in the receivers and large parts to blast out the gunk, but then follow with a heavy Hoppes spray down and another blast to spread it. I've found WD40 which is a lighter viscous and helps float and move blasting junk better than straight Hoppes, in the gallon cans its much more thrifty. I dont use break clean or such as it may get into seams that are difficult to get oils into and dont want to promote crevices with rust, for that reason I only stick to oils. For the small parts I uses cans of compressed air.
Before I go shooting I red grease my guns and then use a heavy oil mix of home mixed snail snot. Large glass jar I mixed up seven years ago is less than 1/3 used and a big savings.
By volume in container 2/3 motor oil 10W30 ( cheapest you can find lowest Severice Code ), 1/3 left is 50% STP and 50% ATF fluid. You will make so much you can give some as gifts to your friends. Always looking for a new convenient locking spout bottle for the range.
 

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The secret to easy gun cleaning is very simple and works well. You have a gun loving friend that likes to shoot your guns? Let him shoot them and then inform him that he shot it so now he has to clean in.

I shoot 8mm corrosive in my ZB26 so its a gun that I clean immediately. Luckily it has a quick change barrel so it makes this much easier. I boil a large measuring cup of water in the microwave and then pour it down the bore from the chamber end. I then clean it like any normal gun which I have shot non corrosive ammo in.
 

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Got my little HF ultrasonic years ago so hopefully they're still decent. Not powerful but it's worked well on a lot of small stuff. The big 7-gal Lyman ultrasonic cleaner is a rebranded Raytech. Pricey but I picked one of those up at a good discount as a scratch and dent unit. Haven't used yet but it's big and seems powerful.
 

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I just have to throw in here that using carb cleaner can have adverse effects. Carb cleaner sucks out ALL of the oil from your parkerizing/bluing and leaves nothing but unprotected metal. It also strips away teflon and other goodies that make modern lubricants so useful. (CLP) Not a problem for you seasoned guys here who know that they have to go and relube again, but new guys sometimes forget. (I know this because I constantly find my work weapons being turned in, BONE dry with little white stains in the nooks, and a few cans of empty carb cleaner in the trash cans....)
 

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Failure to clean can cause malfunctions, so there's a reason to clean reasonably.

For example, I was shooting some of that junk Russian steel case out of my Kimber 1911. It gunked it up so bad in under 100 rounds that I could watch the slide return to battery...until it stopped. An extreme example, but gunk can slow a gun.

For non-corrosive, I run cleaning patches then one patch with oil through the barrel. I pull the bolt and inspect it and wipe it off. Inspecting the bolt is ALWAYS a good idea, not just a matter of clean.

Check breach area for build up, clean with brush or Q-tip, whatever is best.

If it's a belt fed, make sure the top cover mechanisms are cleaned and oiled- you can feel the drag on a dirty top cover, sometimes more than I'd ever believe. The MAG58/ M240 seems to be the most demonstrative of this dirty vs. cleaned & oiled phenomena, but the MG42 top cover also wants to be shiny.

That's about it unless going for a "display" cleaning. That said, some guns are more picky; my S&W 41 likes to be very, very clean in order to run 100%.
 
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