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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Ever since I have owned a 1919 I have heard of the deadly rod of death and of course I have seen the tragic injury to one unfortunate shooter. So I am looking through a military tech manual and found a photo and instruction on how to remove, maintain, and replace the rod of death. I have never read anything about this potentially dangerous assembly. TM 9-1005-212-10.
The manual demonstrates how to remove the spring and rod using the edge of the top cover as a screw driver without undo risk. I set up my tripod and gun and proceeded to risk my life to see if this method really works. With leather gloves, a face shield, I held the bolt in one hand and the other at ready to hold on to the unsupported part of the spring I found that it was an easy thing to do. No special tools needed. I have to admit that it was a little harder to re-assemble it into the bolt but if you are careful to hold the loose part of the spring with your other hand it works well.
I have never seen any mention of this technique before so I am sharing it with you.
 

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Well, certainly is a new one on me! Though I still prefer Dolf's tool for this, there are times when many of us are in the field and have to use what's available. Thanks for sharing that method, and right out of a manual too!
 

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Ever since I have owned a 1919 I have heard of the deadly rod of death and of course I have seen the tragic injury to one unfortunate shooter. So I am looking through a military tech manual and found a photo and instruction on how to remove maintain, and replace the rod of death. I have never read anything about this potentially dangerous assembly. TM 9-1005-212-10.
The manual demonstrates how to remove the spring and rod using the edge of the top cover as a screw driver without undo risk. I set up my tripod and gun and proceeded to risk my life to see if this method really works. With leather gloves, a face shield, I held the bolt in one hand and the other at ready to hold on to the unsupported part of the spring I found that it was an easy thing to do. No special tools needed. I have to admit that it was a little harder to re-assemble it into the bolt but if you are careful to hold the loose part of the spring with your other hand it works well.
I have never seen any mention of this technique before so I am sharing it with you.
8" long piece of 1/2" pipe with a screw driver that has a 8" shaft works great to.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Rod of death

I forgot to mention that you should make double sure that everything on the tripod is locked down tight before attempting this, tool or not. I really don't think this rod would not do more than bruise you if you got hit most anywhere except for the eye or in the _____ well you know.
 

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From the TM 9-1005-212-10

Never saw those instructions before! NEAT!



(skipping a few instruction steps that refer to the takedown of the barrel extension and stripping the bolt)


 

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Cheap? Free? Safe? Safer? I guess whatever you use - just be careful. I still do it the old fashioned dangerous way.......

In any case - these are new to me photo's and instruction too - thanks for posting them!;)
 

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When I bought my first Browning in 1986 all I had to go by were GI manuals, still prefer those over any thing else.
 

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Cheap? Free? Safe? Safer? I guess whatever you use - just be careful. I still do it the old fashioned dangerous way.......

In any case - these are new to me photo's and instruction too - thanks for posting them!;)
I have Dolf's tool but the pictures are cool
 

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Beltfire has proven you can teach an old dog a new trick.
Like most others, this is a new one to me too. :eek:
CaptMax
 

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One Technical Manual also recommended the use of the edge of an ammo box to remove the rod. I think they meant the top edge of the box with the lid open. I notice the pictures shown do not even show a legitimate screw driver being used to lock the rod into the bolt. Instead they are using the handle of an M10 cleaning rod. I suppose that would work but it seems the army could have issued a screw driver with the parts/tool kit. That seems to be one tool they overlooked in all the pictures I have seen of the kits.

Yes a block of wood works to remove the rod from the bolt but as has been mentioned many times on this site it helps to drill a hole part way through the block to keep the rod from slipping. And as several of us have suggested it helps even more to have a nail through the block or a piece of wire or even an old saw blade or piece of sheet metal inserted from the back of the block across the hole to act in place of a screw driver blade. The only thing not recommended for this operation is a screwdriver.
 

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Using the top cover is a new one on me too. The slotted end of the driving spring rod has a concave surface and a cartridge case rim can be used to lock the rod into the the bolt. I have done it just for drill, its not easy but it can be done. The band screw on the M1 carbine is the same design.

As Armorer suggested two blocks of wood with a a jig saw blade between works pretty good especially in a vice.

Whichever method you choose, just keep your mind on the business at hand. With the rod locked into the bolt I never set on the bench unless its pointed at the wall.

 

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rod of death

I have been building and shooting these things for 20 years, last week got a little careless and got one in the nose, a little bleeding but grateful it missed my eye. you can never be too careful- stan
 

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One Technical Manual also recommended the use of the edge of an ammo box to remove the rod. I think they meant the top edge of the box with the lid open. I notice the pictures shown do not even show a legitimate screw driver being used to lock the rod into the bolt. Instead they are using the handle of an M10 cleaning rod. I suppose that would work but it seems the army could have issued a screw driver with the parts/tool kit. That seems to be one tool they overlooked in all the pictures I have seen of the kits.
They did not overlook the screw driver, the handle of the cleaning rod serves as a screw driver quite well.
 

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They did not overlook the screw driver, the handle of the cleaning rod serves as a screw driver quite well.
For the purpose shown (locking the rod into the bolt) It would work perfectly well. Not so much for removing the rod from the bolt. But then the manuals do not recommend it for that. The M10 handle was originally designed to remove and tighten the gas cylinder screw of the M1 Rifle but was handy for other things. It has a hole in it to put a cleaning rod section through for extra leverage. Some place around here I have a cleaning rod handle that is the same dimension but lacks any of the tool function of the M10. It is just a straight metal rod with the thread pivot in the middle. I believe this was one type issued for the M60.
 

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I had the rod go thru the webbing between my thumb and index finger. 6 stitches and $1300 at emergency room. It was late and they were the only ones open in a small town.
 
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