1919 A4 Forums banner

1 - 20 of 41 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello

I have a newby question on my semi 30-06 M1919A4. After I finish firing and remove the belt how do I remove the cartridge remaining?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
509 Posts
If you have fired the entire belt, there won't be a cartridge left in the chamber. If you decide to stop firing before the belt is empty, pull the belt and rack the bolt back and the live round will be ejected. I rack the bolt back and forth a couple of times when done firing and then peek into the chamber to make sure it's really empty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks

I learned a very expensive 30-06 full metal jacket lesson.Neighbor picked weapon up pointed towards front of garage while I wasn't looking and pulled trigger. It shot through my older jeeps tire-Windshield washer tank-bumper-garage door and then into front fender of my new jeep and stopped at front door
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
199 Posts
You got lucky mate all things considered. Your neighbor ignored a couple critical safety rules but I won't beat a dead horse.

With my belt feds I always rack them 3-4 times after I remove the belt. With the variety of operating systems out there and cartridge feed arrangements it's just easier than trying to remember how each individual one works. I also like to at a minimum do a visual inspection of the chamber, I prefer sticking my pinky in there but on my .50 I settle for the visual. Quite fond of my digit in it's current configuration. Goryunov, MG-42, or .30 cal? I hod the bolt to the rear and do a good digital inspection. Call it an abundance of caution but I have been around too many negligent discharges to not do it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Yes sir I even cleaned the barrell month ago with live round. The neighbor admitted to forgetting to clear. My insurance company is suing him. This lesson cost me 4-5K out of pocket. There goes my side plate
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,413 Posts
ANYTIME you clear a weapon - visually inspect for live ammunition in the barrel. Racking the bolt will ( should ) clear the gun, but people get injured and killed with "empty" guns. Good stories, and well worth repeating. I have a former freind ( former because he is dead) who left a live round in an AK, and when pushing it into a case in a truck bed caused it to fire killing him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,801 Posts
Yes sir I even cleaned the barrell month ago with live round. The neighbor admitted to forgetting to clear. My insurance company is suing him. This lesson cost me 4-5K out of pocket. There goes my side plate
Your insurance company is suing him? They should sue you for negligence, YOU cleaned a weapon with a round in the chamber and returned it to him that way. It sounds like you know very little about this weapon and you almost got someone killed. Please take some time to reflect on your responsibilities as a gun owner. Now just so I cant be accused of just giving an ass chewing, Ill try and add something productive. When clearing a belt fed, ALWAYS remember the three 'S' words.

1) Place on SAFE (if applicable)
2) SWEEP the feed tray (removing linked ammo)
3) SEE into the chamber and t-slot or bolt head. (Visually inspect the chamber AND bolt face)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
195 Posts
1st People Shouldn't F*** With **** they have no clue what there doing.... I thought Common sense treat every firearm as if it's loaded. @ScottD is 100% right.....
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
11,291 Posts
After my AD, I instated a new policy. A visual inspection is not enough, unless the barrel is out of the chamber. Now, a cleaning rod most go from muzzle to breach and be exposed for me to believe that the chamber is empty.
I racked that Rpd no less than a dozen times. Was looking in the receiver. Never saw the round. It happens.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
728 Posts
Just a reminder for the C1/C5A1 owners you have to use a screwdriver to push the last round out of the t-slot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Your insurance company is suing him? They should sue you for negligence, YOU cleaned a weapon with a round in the chamber and returned it to him that way. It sounds like you know very little about this weapon and you almost got someone killed. Please take some time to reflect on your responsibilities as a gun owner. Now just so I cant be accused of just giving an ass chewing, Ill try and add something productive. When clearing a belt fed, ALWAYS remember the three 'S' words.

1) Place on SAFE (if applicable)
2) SWEEP the feed tray (removing linked ammo)
3) SEE into the chamber and t-slot or bolt head. (Visually inspect the chamber AND bolt face)
I guess Im not as perfect as you. Yes I failed to clear the round after removing belt.It was the first time I fired the weapon. I did not hand the weapon to my neighbor he picked it up and failed to clear I am a Vietnam combat vet and have cleared many weapons but never a belt fed.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
11,291 Posts
so its yours and you failed to clear it. but you think it is the neighbors fault for not clearing it either?

you are lucky no one was hurt and you are only out money. but at some point you need to learn to own your mistakes... this one belongs to you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
so its yours and you failed to clear it. but you think it is the neighbors fault for not clearing it either?

you are lucky no one was hurt and you are only out money. but at some point you need to learn to own your mistakes... this one belongs to you.
Thanks for the ***** slap Rory. I do own it its costing me $2500 out of pocket
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,002 Posts
In my younger years, after a day at the range I pulled a rifle out of the vehicle to clean it and found a live round. Then I did it about a year later. Both times it scared the heck out of me- the complete negligence!!

However, after decades of competitive shooting of both rifles and handguns, it is now automatic that I visually inspect the chamber and pull the trigger (except on .22s). When handed ANY gun, even at the LGS, I visually inspect the chamber.

I think it's a good habit to get into. Also, using a chamber flag is a habit, and it's one I'm glad I have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,413 Posts
I don't want to start a run of " I pulled the trigger" stories, but several NDs have occurred in my work world when security personnel or troops "pulled the trigger" on supposedly unloaded weapons. Having the muzzle pointed down range or in a clearing barrel is the only safe way to perform that trigger pull. I don't recommend using that as a part of your clearing process. I use the rod down the barrel for checking before I start cleaning / dis assembly too. Visual inspection of the chamber is a good start. I have had people stand there with a supervisor watching, clear their pistol by ejecting a live round, forgetting to remove the mag first, ( NOT caught by supervisor) load another round from the mag, remove mag and then pull trigger ( VERY contrary to our clearing procedure- but part of the persons "other" part time dept process) and discharge a round into the floor because he was distracted talking to another person. Minor frag injuries to several officers. I had another case where an officer took a supposedly unloaded pistol, decided to check to see if it was loaded by pulling the trigger ( safely aiming at the lower portion of a wall). the pistol discharged, and he killed a toilet ( thankfully unoccupied) on the other side of the wall . It was never determined why the pistol had a round in the chamber .
I can't over emphasize how important dealing with safety and firearms is. My dead friend essentially killed himself by his own negligence. the only thing that could have been worse, was to have killed someone else.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
I don't want to start a run of " I pulled the trigger" stories, but several NDs have occurred in my work world when security personnel or troops "pulled the trigger" on supposedly unloaded weapons. Having the muzzle pointed down range or in a clearing barrel is the only safe way to perform that trigger pull. I don't recommend using that as a part of your clearing process. I use the rod down the barrel for checking before I start cleaning / dis assembly too. Visual inspection of the chamber is a good start. I have had people stand there with a supervisor watching, clear their pistol by ejecting a live round, forgetting to remove the mag first, ( NOT caught by supervisor) load another round from the mag, remove mag and then pull trigger ( VERY contrary to our clearing procedure- but part of the persons "other" part time dept process) and discharge a round into the floor because he was distracted talking to another person. Minor frag injuries to several officers. I had another case where an officer took a supposedly unloaded pistol, decided to check to see if it was loaded by pulling the trigger ( safely aiming at the lower portion of a wall). the pistol discharged, and he killed a toilet ( thankfully unoccupied) on the other side of the wall . It was never determined why the pistol had a round in the chamber .
I can't over emphasize how important dealing with safety and firearms is. My dead friend essentially killed himself by his own negligence. the only thing that could have been worse, was to have killed someone else.
Agree totally I have handled firearms for over 60 years including Vietnam in 1969. This is the most stupid error I've ever committed
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
11,291 Posts
MG08, I think last time this came up you corrected us from calling it an AD to an ND. you were correct then and correct now. I will try to remember the correct nomenclature.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,801 Posts
I guess Im not as perfect as you. Yes I failed to clear the round after removing belt.It was the first time I fired the weapon. I did not hand the weapon to my neighbor he picked it up and failed to clear I am a Vietnam combat vet and have cleared many weapons but never a belt fed.
'Not as perfect as me'? Loose the attitude bro. I respect the fact that you posted your mistake here, but the simple fact of the matter is you dont have the required skill set to operate this weapon safely. Im not saying that you cant learn, but you shouldn't have been playing with this gun in the first place. Like I said earlier, please take the time to understand your responsibilities as a gun owner and understand the weapons you own.

As far as being a 'Vietnam combat vet'.....thats all the more reason why you should have known better. The 'Vet' card wont fly with me. (I just spent the last week running a M2 and M240 range for a Bn. of support troops, NONE of them were allowed NEAR the weapons system until they could demonstrate basic safety proficiency.)

Thank your for sharing your tale of epic stupidity with us. Your actions warrant the harshest of responses. I seek to serve as a mindful mentor, dont let this one incident dictate your future participation here. I hope you have leaned and take sole responsibility for your actions. I hope your future posts are range reports of piles of hot brass and holes in targets in a safe and responsible manner.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
11,291 Posts
@ScottD he started his first post with attitude. and maybe a little unfair with such a small data set, but 20%+ of his posts have mentioned his status as a vietnam vet. I think he just likes to tell people.

maybe just assumed that we would all have his back on the damages and blame his neighbor too.
 
1 - 20 of 41 Posts
Top