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Thanks for sharing your painful story. Hopefully it will save others from that experience.

I am still very jittery every time I do this. These days I only break it down about once a year, but rest assured I will continue to be very cautious. Thanks and I hope your recovery continues.
 

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PhD in Over-Engineering
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That's a very good point. Does ANYONE have the spec for length and diameter of the cross pin? That would be very good information to have.
This pin is the same drawing number and component as the spring retainer for the firing pin, A20498. Length is .489 -.005 and diameter is .0945 -.0010. That's essentially a 3/32 pin up to .001 oversize.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Just Curious who made your eye? Mine was made by Randy Trawnik and its pretty damned good. Not gun related, just wondering. J
John Hadlock of Eye Concern. He is split between offices in Phoenix and Mesa Az.

Feel free to make this a sticky. Feel free to share this on other boards. If it helps save someones life, or prevent injury... I'm all about it. Thanks for all the positive words and sharing stories.
 

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I remember picking up my watercooled 1917a1 many years ago and my dealer going over the danger of that rod several times because I had no 1919/1917 experience. He told me horror stories of guys getting hit with them on the 30 and 50 cal guns. He told me as was mentioned above to always stay off to the side when disassembling and reassembling and always keep it pointed away like it is a loaded gun.
I am very sorry to see what you have gone through and thank you very much for taking the time to post as this surely shows the dangers associated with the guns we play with. Dan
 

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My66coupe,
I am so very sorry you had to go through that ordeal but as some one pointed out i have said for over 3 Decades "a 30 will try and Hurt you ,a 50 will try and Kill You !!" and i did not mean just firing them !!!
You read the "Bad things happen..." topic and how the 50 gutted it`s self After Just back from RESET a total inspection and Testing of the elements by Magma Flux (crack detector ) and the barrel extension failed due to metal fatigue !! It is not less of a problem with 1919`s these guns are complex and dangerous Even when not being fired . "Bad things....." could happen to anyone of us at any time !! Most of the semis are made out of used parts sets think about it a minute and you will understand my Point !!!

Buck`s warning about protective gear in that topic should be a Warning to Everyone a simple face shield might have saved your eye just as a vest and plate may save your life on the line shooting !!!
You know why T&S plates are the best because Sam heat treated the back 1 1/2" just like the specs call for and that spec existed for a Reason !!!

Any MG/Semi like these is a dance with the Devil plain and simple ! It is a matter of When not If !!!
 

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Rod of death

While not a guarantee it cannot happen, Dolf's tool adds a measure of safety when working the rod-of-death. Where can I get Dolf's tool? Also, is there a simple and prudent modification that might be made to the bolt and/or rod to reduce such accidents?
Treat the Rod and Spring/ bolt as a LOADED GUN with a HAIR TRIGGER THAT HAS BEEN BUMPED HARD ! DON'T LOOK DOWN THE BARREL.
 

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That's what I'm sayin' -- look at post 16 to see the easy, cheap way to avoid this problem ! "Don't stick things in your eyes." Didn't yo mamma tell ya?

Carry On!
Gary
><>
 

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I would guess most guide rod accidents happen because it is not in the lock position. Its very important that you feel it go in to the locking notch. This is best done with a fixture you can make yourself for cheap in about an hour.The pics are on the tech forum.J.R.
 

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Thanks for the thread so that we all can remember to watch out. Hope things move on well for you with everything.

Later 42rocker
 

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Aware and will remember

Thanks for letting us know. These "toys" are deadly by design. My own incident was traumatic but gave me only a few scars and pieces of metal in my fingers and hand.

I received one of the first Norinco Dragunovs that came into the country and took it to the range. I have cleaned it carefully at home (I thought) and reassembled it. Just for the hell of it I installed the scope to see if it was sighted in? (Thank God).

The first shot was nondescript but an immediate second shot followed rapidly. There was an explosion and the rifle jumped in my hands. When the smoke cleared I looked at the metal receiver cover wrapped around the scope instead of my face. The bolt carrier and bolt were driven back into the stock wood at the rear of the receiver. Everything else looked normal save the blood on my face and hands.

I patched myself up and learned 2 things... CHINESE ARMS SUCK ASS.. and dont give a damn about firing pin springs or finishing guns.....(burr on pin stuck in forward position----discharged out of battery) and two...do not use gun ranges with concrete barriers on each shooting position. Shrapnel bounces back into your face.

I have some scratches and bits of metal popping out of my fingers for two years. The importer replaced the drag with another....I sold it asap and a pallet of ammo.
 

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Glad I read this.

Have seen many springs and parts fly across rooms and luckily not into people. But thank you for posting, if it helps anybody stay safe, it is worth it.

I had a CETME bite my thumb once, still don't know how it did that.

The things in this post and then maybe some pictures of people with scope bite might be a good training presentation for new shooters.
 

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While I have never had an accident with the BMG bolt spring I have launched a couple of M1911 pistol recoil spring plungers. They make a neat dent in a plaster ceiling or a hole in a cheap plastic suspended ceiling. I had to learn the trick the hard way. The plunger actually has a little stud pressed into it and the recoil spring is supposed to be screwed into the plunger so it doesn't go anywhere if accidentally released.

I believe I had the barrel return spring plunger of a M1919A4 come loose while trying to assemble it but only got a slight nick in a finger. I think that plunger only traveled about two inches when released.

Someplace around here I have a captive recoil spring rod for a .50 caliber BMG it is about 16 inches long. I wish they had come up with something like that for the .30 cal. The .30 cal has a spring about 15 inches long compressed into about two inches of bolt. You would think the military would have found a better way to secure it in the bolt.
 

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...

Someplace around here I have a captive recoil spring rod for a .50 caliber BMG it is about 16 inches long. I wish they had come up with something like that for the .30 cal. The .30 cal has a spring about 15 inches long compressed into about two inches of bolt. You would think the military would have found a better way to secure it in the bolt.

Something like this?

This is one of a few designs I have, but not the better one:

IMG_4690.jpg IMG_4691.jpg

I feel this is an idea that needs to be shared to come up with a better solution.


I'll post the other one tonight, need to find it in the pile of worthless one-off inventions I have. Lol
 

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I do like the idea of a semi-captive drive spring on the 1919. Perhaps there is enough interest to get something going.
 
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