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Could you do one similar to the pps43? Put the little bar on the end and drill a hole in the side of the bolt so it can't shoot out.
 

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I think when I work on mine from now on I will wear eye protection, even a pair of shooting glasses which should be near by is better than nothing. Not only on this gun, but any gun.

Reminds me years ago I was reassembling a mauser k98 bolt and lost grip and it shot up and stabbed me in the forehead, hard enough to bleed. I guess safety glasses is something I usually didn't think of when cleaning a gun. I will from now on.
 

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Because it is a challenge... anyone can use Dolf's idea, and it is a good one. :urtheman:
Why not use a model A? It went down the road??? Same idea
Steamer
 

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PhD in Over-Engineering
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I gotta think this one over. Is there a way to do it so you don't have to drill the bolt??? Haven't figured it out yet but I will come up with something.

Remember a team effort is better than 1 alone. Suggestions???
Of course there is a way. It is possible to do this with no modification to the gun at all. I have a design that has been on the back burner since long before I left L.A. Had parts made up for some of the assembly years ago, but not having access, then, to machinery, I could not afford to pay my job shop guy to continue development. I've talked with Porter about this, but I still have time limitations keeping me from getting back on it. I suppose it's time to get back on the stick, since this keeps popping up.
 

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Is there any reason it cannot be done like the 50bmg? A full length rod that goes through the bolt, and the spring can't.
 

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Is there any reason it cannot be done like the 50bmg? A full length rod that goes through the bolt, and the spring can't.
No reason at all. In fact, your best examples are in the .30 cal models that already exist. That would be the Colt Commercial guns, such as the 1928, or the M37 of the 1950s. But these all require modification to the side plate to retain the captive spring guide. Nothing wrong with that if you don't mind modifying both the bolt and the side plate, or at least the bolt in Porter's version. I am looking forward to seeing how this all develops and encourage anyone and everyone to keep after this.

But the other concept is to have a system that not only requires no modification to any component of the gun, but also resolves the safety issues Porter describes. In other words, a drop-in product that can go in any gun, get the job done, and yet be a safely contained system in itself.
 

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Been pondering this unit....Semi or FA UZI recoil spring.

Its captive and a similar length.

Just a thought for a cheapish already produced alternative. Would require bolt drilling or a redesign to a 2 piece/telescoping rod.


Semi unit does not have the rear plate.

micro/mini/full size in pic 1....best guess
3ywvlh1.jpg


FA unit
2506125_01_uzi_smg_recoil_spring_assembly_640.jpg




I'm thinking a substitute drive rod similar to this...


sig556pbpvtfull2.jpg

with a "tube" in the forward area..that slides on/around the pin/rod.This would allow it to be compressed and locked for removal.
Obviously the math envolved would be a critical measurement to keep it from locking in (short) position while fireing but its perhaps doable..

Keeping it all captive could be tricky.

disscuss.......
 

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As per my request -- Thang Kew! :urtheman:

Carry On!
Gary
><>
 

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Discussion Starter #52
I haven't been on the forum for quite some time and just noticed this was made into a sticky. The 5 year "anniversary" is approaching this July and not a day goes by where I don't think about the incident, the what ifs etc. Life goes on. I got married (to the girl that stuck by my side during the ordeal), returned back to work a short 2 months after and am trying to start a family.

I reassembled the 1919 and its been sitting in the back of the safe. One day I'll find the courage to play with it again. My collecting focus has changed to German WWII, primarily K98ks.

Hopefully this thread serves as an education and a warning to new and old 1919 operators!
 

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I haven't been on the forum for quite some time and just noticed this was made into a sticky. The 5 year "anniversary" is approaching this July and not a day goes by where I don't think about the incident, the what ifs etc. Life goes on. I got married (to the girl that stuck by my side during the ordeal), returned back to work a short 2 months after and am trying to start a family.

I reassembled the 1919 and its been sitting in the back of the safe. One day I'll find the courage to play with it again. My collecting focus has changed to German WWII, primarily K98ks.

Hopefully this thread serves as an education and a warning to new and old 1919 operators!

My66coupe, It's great to hear that things seems to be going well for you after such a horrific incident.

Thank you so much for sharing your experiences to help the rest of us be more aware of the danger. It has certainly change the way I go about things when working with my browning belt feds.

BTW, my first car when I was 16 was a '66 Mustang Coupe

Good luck and God bless!
 

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glad to hear you're still doing well after all these years. I have owned my 1919 for 15+ years and put quite a few thousands of rounds through it, and have never taken out the spring. I clean it after shooting it, yes. but never was that anal retentive to also take out the spring and clean it after each shoot. especially since it's located where it won't get gummed up with a ton of carbon
 

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Since your initial post, I have shared this with anyone that has/shoots or could work on a 1919. In addition, it changed my attitude and the way I handle the bolt when it's out of the gun or the back plate is removed. I basically treat it like a loaded pistol. It's certainly the one post that sticks in my mind every time I disassemble my gun. I hope it helps to know you sharing your story has helped prevent others from the same agony. And sounds like you married a good lady, best of luck on the family!
 

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I have had the cross pin in the rod fail twice now, while the spring is compressed and bolt removed. Only careful handling and keeping it pointed in a safe direction kept damage and injury down. I am pretty anal about it anyway but more so now. You do really need to remove and clean the spring and rod since corrosion can lead to failure . When I finally took some post sample guns apart all had corrosion on the spring and rod. Now it gets dis-assembled fairly often. You can use a small tall socket to make a tool too.
 

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PhD in Over-Engineering
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I haven't been on the forum for quite some time and just noticed this was made into a sticky. The 5 year "anniversary" is approaching this July and not a day goes by where I don't think about the incident, the what ifs etc. Life goes on. I got married (to the girl that stuck by my side during the ordeal), returned back to work a short 2 months after and am trying to start a family.

I reassembled the 1919 and its been sitting in the back of the safe. One day I'll find the courage to play with it again. My collecting focus has changed to German WWII, primarily K98ks.

Hopefully this thread serves as an education and a warning to new and old 1919 operators!
Glad to hear you are doing so well. I had my own incident, moving my 1500 lb gun safe last summer, and it could have finished me off for good, but just left me with a broken arm and torn up shoulder. Quite different from what you went through, but I understand the life changing event. Sounds like you had found a keeper, and an ordeal like you went through proves what she is made of. Good on you, and best of luck with getting a family going.

When you get ready to face the beast again, just remember that you have a bunch of guys here who have your back and are willing to help. Facing the beast may seem daunting, but the challenge will be rewarding, I assure you. Let us know if we can help. And thanks, once more, for sharing your story here. It serves as a valuable statement that all who acquire a Browning need to be aware of. God bless.
 

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^^^ like Lucky said...

im glad you have not abandoned the gun... & we did a thread back in the day when this happened to me.. wasnt a serious injury for me... but it was sure an awakening experience that these things could hurt you in various ways.

from OOB's to springs to even hurting your back lifting the set ups..... these old guns are no joke.

glad your doing well & moving on in life!
 

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My66coupe SEZ: "...Hopefully this thread serves as an education and a warning to new and old 1919 operators!"

Undoubtedly, it has, hence my efforts to have it posted as a 'sticky.' Maybe the most important warning to others we have here, and I have repeatedly passed it on. Surprising how little even the most knowledgeable amongst us have not been aware of this danger and practiced appropriate safety when removing the thing! Glad your suffering has come to good. Best wishes to you and your new family's beginning -- may God bless y'all.


Carry On!
Gary
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You do really need to remove and clean the spring and rod since corrosion can lead to failure . When I finally took some post sample guns apart all had corrosion on the spring and rod.
I got curious so I went and took the rod and spring out. no corrosion, rust etc... just dirty, and not by much. so I wiped it down put some fresh BRAKE-FREE and put it back in. good for another 15+ years :D



You can use a small tall socket to make a tool too.
didn't need to ruin a socket, or buy some expensive gizmo tool. I used MrM4 technique on post #49. worked like a charm taken out the rod and spring and putting it back in.

Thanks MrM4 for sharing that technique :). it will save people from spending money on something they don't really need
 
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