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There is a consistent rule on this. The rod slot is in a fixed position related to the locking pin. The locked position in the bolt will have the slot in the vertical position. Yes, it can be rotated 360 degrees, well past the locking point. Also, there are notches in the bolt that you can feel when the pin seats itself properly. It will be evident with a slight easing of pressure on the rod, so that the cross pin can engage with the rearward facing notches in the bolt cavity. You will quickly develop a feel for that, but always combine that "feel" with the visual reference and you will have no problems.

The rule of thumb I suggest is that you depress the rod- bolt in full retracted position- with the rod slot in the horizontal position. That gives you a reliable visual as well as mechanical reference. Once fully depressed into the bolt cavity, rotate clockwise to the 90 degree point, where the slot is visibly vertical. Anything less... or more (past)... than straight vertical and your rod is not fully secured in the bolt. With practice you will get to know that feel, but the visual will be a great guide while developing that.
Thanks for the explanation of process...perfect! Field strip tomorrow. I may see if my old hockey gear still fits and don while field stripping lol.
 

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PhD in Over-Engineering
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Thanks for the explanation of process...perfect! Field strip tomorrow. I may see if my old hockey gear still fits and don while field stripping lol.
That's funny. Be sure to take pictures and share them, lol! Anyway, glad we could help you out.
 

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Thanks for the explanation of process...perfect! Field strip tomorrow. I may see if my old hockey gear still fits and don while field stripping lol.
If you have not done so, you might try m1919tech.com for information on barrels, and many other subjects.. this site is a communial effort of many of the members.
 

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Not sure if it was mentioned of not, The rod o"Death can some times slip when out of the gun, out of the notch if it isn't seated correctly or you have a pin failure . I treat it like a loaded gun and don't point it at any thing or any one I don't want to kill.

I have had a pin break off and the rod fly out at warp speed.

Steamer
 

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There is a consistent rule on this. The rod slot is in a fixed position related to the locking pin. The locked position in the bolt will have the slot in the vertical position. Yes, it can be rotated 360 degrees, well past the locking point. Also, there are notches in the bolt that you can feel when the pin seats itself properly. It will be evident with a slight easing of pressure on the rod, so that the cross pin can engage with the rearward facing notches in the bolt cavity. You will quickly develop a feel for that, but always combine that "feel" with the visual reference and you will have no problems.

The rule of thumb I suggest is that you depress the rod- bolt in full retracted position- with the rod slot in the horizontal position. That gives you a reliable visual as well as mechanical reference. Once fully depressed into the bolt cavity, rotate clockwise to the 90 degree point, where the slot is visibly vertical. Anything less... or more (past)... than straight vertical and your rod is not fully secured in the bolt. With practice you will get to know that feel, but the visual will be a great guide while developing that.
Successful field strip and re-assemble today!... and I understand the rod quite a bit better. It appears to me that 99.9% of the rod risk is when the back plate is not installed or bolt removed? The remaining .1% would be if the tabs on the rod failed and ejected through the hole in the back plate? Thanks again all!

I'll try and post some pics haven't figured that out yet.
 

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Not sure if it was mentioned of not, The rod o"Death can some times slip when out of the gun, out of the notch if it isn't seated correctly or you have a pin failure . I treat it like a loaded gun and don't point it at any thing or any one I don't want to kill.

I have had a pin break off and the rod fly out at warp speed.

Steamer
Thanks Steamer is a good reminder, I kept that thing pointed at an old section of drywall. Since I don't know the history on this particular gun I might consider getting a new rod so I know the pins are less fatigued.
 

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If you have not done so, you might try m1919tech.com for information on barrels, and many other subjects.. this site is a communial effort of many of the members.
This site is fantastic, I have learned more about barrels and markings more than could have ever imagined... lol its like a candyland of discovery
 

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Not sure if it was mentioned of not, The rod o"Death can some times slip when out of the gun, out of the notch if it isn't seated correctly or you have a pin failure . I treat it like a loaded gun and don't point it at any thing or any one I don't want to kill.

I have had a pin break off and the rod fly out at warp speed.

Steamer
Rod O'Death would be a great name for St. Patrick's Day!
 

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PhD in Over-Engineering
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Rod O'Death would be a great name for St. Patrick's Day!
Dang it. It never fails. Someone puts an idea in my head and I can't shake it until I work it out of my system. There goes about 15 minutes of my day....

The Legend of Rod O'Death

That scourge of the Emerald Isle himself;
What terror he wreaks o’er the unwary soul.
His weapon? ‘Tis named for him, that mystic elf.
His victims? The gunners, who carelessly roll.

Their drive spring rods, lazily, short of full lock;
Such recklessness leaves them to breath their last breath.
It flies! Penetrating with full mortal shock,
The fatal spring gun of that rogue, Rod O’Death!

Two days late, but happy St. Pats!
 

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Dang it. It never fails. Someone puts an idea in my head and I can't shake it until I work it out of my system. There goes about 15 minutes of my day....

The Legend of Rod O'Death

That scourge of the Emerald Isle himself;
What terror he wreaks o’er the unwary soul.
His weapon? ‘Tis named for him, that mystic elf.
His victims? The gunners, who carelessly roll.

Their drive spring rods, lazily, short of full lock;
Such recklessness leaves them to breath their last breath.
It flies! Penetrating with full mortal shock,
The fatal spring gun of that rogue, Rod O’Death!

Two days late, but happy St. Pats!
JEEZE LOUISE some of have talent most of us don't.

This one's a keeper, I'm thinking of having it tattooed on...Well I don't think it will fit on second thought.
 

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correct headspace, correct parts, don't assume. safe place to shoot and think about nearby animals especial when there is rapid fire. One good place for me to shoot is down along the woods in a bottom of a valley, I live on a farm, but my sister's dogs were in a nearby pen and never thought about them. Somewhere along the line of using my crankfire 1919, shooting maybe a 100 rounds in 15 seconds. The dogs were so scared they scratched their way under the sharp pen wire and cut themselves up pretty good. I did find them later that day and all their cuts healed after awhile. Live and learn, don't forget about a small friends to.
 

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Amazing

:eek: Like others I went in to a 1919 flying blind, I was told by the vendor that my kit was a 308. This came from a very respected dealer at knob creek mg shoot and I assumed it was correct. After many hours the weapon was ready to go. The first 3 shots went off without a hitch till I looked at the ground. Straight wall 308 cases. The big man was looking out for me. or I would have been layn in the er or in the ground. I took the gun apart drove 4 hours to scottsville ky to cole dist. and had a professional build my 1919.
Now I have a very nice 1919 that works properly, Dan at Cole Dist. was very helpful and showed me the proper operation, head spacing, ect. Now I dont have to worry about killing myself or any one else. DO YOURSELF A FAVOR PUT AWAY YOUR PRIDE ! ASK QUESTIONS AND DO YOUR HOMEWORK LIKE I SHOULD HAVE DONE IN THE FIRST PLACE.
Amazing how many shooters don't understand the difference between headspace and timing. I won't mention the name but a reputable manufacturer sent me my full auto 1917A1 with a converted (Sleeved chamber) 8mm barrel chambered to .308. If anyone wants a .308/32 cal barrel I have one. Check, check and recheck. Take nothing for granted. One phone call and the next morning a new Izzy .308 barrel was on my door step. Just guessing but their machinist must have assumed the gun was a .30cal gun. So why didn't they send the Izzy barrel in the first place. Why go to the trouble of sleeving a barrel??????
 

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The headspace issues are actually consistent with my understanding of headspace on other firearms. I'll summarize how I see it, and anyone feel free to correct me if I'm misunderstanding anything.

Headspace is defined as the distance between the breech (bolt face) and, for non-rimmed, non-belted bottleneck cartridges, a datum in the chamber where the shoulder is some particular diameter. This distance is controlled by the various parts involved in locking the breech to the chamber (bolt to the barrel). Normally headspace is set when a firearm is built, to account for the stacking tolerances of those parts. AKs set it by how deeply the barrel is pressed and pinned into the trunnion. FALs with the locking shoulder that the back of bolt locks against. ARs by how far the barrel is screwed into the barrel extension before being pinned. 1919s similarly by how far the barrel is screwed into the barrel extension, but the user has to set the headspace, to allow for changing barrels.

Since setting headspace on most firearms is an armorer level task, gauges that actually test the distance between the breech and headspace datum are used. Anything that could give a false reading, like extractors or AR-style ejectors, should be removed. With the 1919, headspacing by the user is simplified to checking the distance between the bolt face and barrel. The headspace is still the distance between the breech and headspace datum, but it's easier to check the distance between the bolt face and barrel under adverse conditions. On the barrel side, this simplification assumes the chamber has been cut correctly. On the bolt side, it assumes the T slot has been cut correctly. If the barrel, bolt, and headspace gauge all match as 7.62x51, 30-06, 8mm, etc., it's safe to trust the military headspace technique, otherwise JMB wouldn't have designed it that way, and the military wouldn't have accepted it and continued using it.

Where people get into trouble, and what I didn't consider, is by mixing parts. The 7.62x51 bolt functions with 30-06 and 8mm, but the T slot might give false headspace readings with the type gauge used for headspacing other firearms. The slot is integral to the bolt and can't be removed to avoid the false readings, like how extractors are supposed to be removed from bolts. Overall, it sounds like the main reason to encourage an alternative headspace technique is because it's less prone to user error. There might be other issues with 8mm. I'm not as familiar with that caliber or 1919 conversions.

There's also the matter of .308 vs. 7.62x51. Looser/longer headspace is allowed for 7.62x51 to remain safe in thermally expanded chambers. 7.62x51 brass is thicker to accommodate this headspace difference. Make sure the headspace is safe for .308 before shooting .308. I recommend this for all military surplus 7.62x51s.
 
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