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Gents, I have a serious question here. As Im getting older, (47) Ive noticed my eyes arent working the way they should. I saw an optomtrist about 2 years ago and he prescribed me some bifocals for reading with a faint magnification for distance. I cant wear them for more than 30 minutes without headaches. I cant do any 'near' work anymore (detailed gunsmithing, working on small items) without a pair of cheaters.

Now this is where things get rough. My shot groups have gone to sheet in the last few years. (About doubled in size from what I was capable of 20 years ago.) Even with a scoped gun, Im finding that I still have accuracy issues. Shouldnt a scope negate the need for prescription glasses while on the range?

Sadly, this also may just be poor form on my behalf, as I only get to shoot once every 3-4 months now. Im just finding it harder and harder to keep good groups and I really have to wonder if its my eyes or me just being sloppy?
 

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Yep , been there , done that . Had 20/05 vision as a kid and 20/10 most of my adult life . Started to go south about 10-15 years ago , starting with 1.25 power readers , Now I'm up to 4x readers and need to go to 5X . Started off with 1X for long range and went through each step , now at 2X . Bifocals give me a headache , so that may be that problem .Sold off my 100 + WW2 collection because I couldn't see the sights anymore .Went with modern 1911 types with high definition tritium sights and green lasers for my pistols . Went with modern AR type SBRs and rifles with good clear optics . I can still focus them for bare eyes , but I'm maxing them out . I'll have to start focusing them for glasses soon . Red dot " point and circle " work well, too , but I prefer 1-4X scopes on my close in stuff and big 6/8 - 20/25 X on the long reach ones ..I have a Barrett M82A1 and a ton of spotter / tracer for when the eyes really go , trouble is finding a good carry holster for it .
Chris
 

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Same here, I've got a few years on you @ScottD but not many. I tried "progressives" and absolutely hated them because they try to be all things for all situations. That may work for some people but not me (thank goodness for cheap optometry places that have liberal return policies!) and avoided glasses forever until I started shooting skeet and couldn't deny my vision issue any longer. I tried contacts first and discovered that I am unable to put a contact lens in my eyeball. I can poke myself in the eye all day long but cannot seat or remove a lens. Period. Wasted 20 samples trying to get one in.

Here is what I did: two pairs of glasses.
1. A set of glasses that are standard 'fixed vision' for everything 5-feet to infinity. These I use for shooting (including subgun and pistol).
2. A set of glasses that are 'Office Progressives' (or 'Workplace Progressives' or 'Near Range Progressives') for everything 1-foot to 3-feet. These I use for working on things, or reading a book or computer monitor.

The progressive lens, while being around for over a decade, is still an emerging and improving technology. I'm seeing more and more companies making new breeds of progressive lenses like Zeiss making three different versions of 'Office Progressives' (described here: Better vision and more comfort at work )

Here is a short article to get you started:
Workspace Progressives – Office Progressives | Zenni Optical

If you want to get into the weeds on how progressive lenses work, this company has great videos, the presenter is a little odd but he knows his business well:

Progressive Lenses:

Office Progressives:


Lastly, don't cheap out on glasses. I started with Visionworks then LensCrafters. Both will admit that their product is 'okay' quality. I could see the flaws in their product. Both have liberal return policies so I walked away from both at no cost after having glasses made by both. I eventually found a Optician that I could discuss and describe what I wanted (two pairs) and they worked out prescriptions to fit my lifestyle.

If you have any questions post them up. I'd be happy to answer. It took me a year to get to where I am with my vision and I am VERY HAPPY I took the time to research and learn. Now every time I shoot skeet, my buddy, when I take my sunglasses off and put on my fixed vision glasses, says "uh oh, out comes the secret weapon!" ;)
 

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It is the shits getting old, I have to use a magnifier for reading markings and working on small stuff now. I use scopes on most of my long guns. I do have progressive glasses and they seem to work quite well for most things in my case.
Greg
 

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It gets worse. Scopes do help correct vision but I have to take off the glasses to shoot with them, red dots on everything you want to keep. Close in really started to go bad at around the same age factor 1.5 readers then up. Now I use 1.5 for normal sight and 3.25 for close up. Distance now becoming a problem without glasses. Bifocals made me lose perception of depth so bad I thought they were dangerous with anything but sitting. Laser eye surgery is the best choice and the pricing has come way down. You should consider it. I'm getting close to just do it. I've never heard anyone say they regret the laser eye surgery and everyone recommends it.
 

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Cheaters for computer work and such.

For gun work the miracle cure is this: Amazon.com: Donegan DA-5 OptiVisor Headband Magnifier, 2.5x Magnification, 8" Focal Length: Sports & Outdoors (you can get less or more expensive versions)
I've seen those and thought about it. I've noticed that are jeweler uses one. I've also thought about one of these
 

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Accurate shooting is a perishable skill. You got to keep it up with practice. The older you get the more repetition it takes.

I got a good friend pushing 80. I had him and the kid out for a range day a while back. As always i just slightly out shot my son - normal. But Don kicked our asses. AND he's got the palsy fairly bad. My son could not believe it. But Don practices every week.

Good glasses certainly help but only take you so far.
 

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I tried progressives, but they just don't fit my life - particularly at work. Most of what is important to me is two feet away, which is mid range. But I must quickly transition from that to very close detail focus, and then to infinity. With progressives, what is in focus at mid range is a 4 inch diameter circle. This required I constantly move my head rather than just my eyes; it was very fatiguing. I now wear conventional tri-focals. Everything at which I look is in focus.

As I mentioned in the FN-FAL thread, iron sights on rifles just don't work well anymore. Glass is your friend. I can still shoot pistol with my tri-focals, I just need to tilt back my head so as to focus on the front sight with the mid focal range. I could us a fixed, mid range focal distance lens as competitive shooters do, but I think it best to train how I may have to fight.
 
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