1919 A4 Forums banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,134 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Have a nice original M1 Water Chest (2nd Series) commonly found on with early WWII M1917A1 water cooled guns. What you see in the picture is exactly what you will receive. It appears to be in very good condition but is surplus to my current needs. I would like $150 for it plus actual shipping.


First I will take it followed by a PM gets it. Please ask any questions prior to saying you will take it. Thanks for looking. SOLD to Steamer - PAID.

Ammunition box Gun accessory

I am also looking for an early series 1 (where the drain plug protrudes from the bottom of the can and there is no lip on the bottom of the can) water chest for my M1917 Browning, let me know if you have one.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,299 Posts
that was a good buy.

Got one so I passed. Did pay a bit/lot more for mine.

Whats next Albert??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
695 Posts
Thanks Guy's,

It was late for me ....

I thought I saw a small Stamped "BA" in the lower back,left hand side

Steamer:devillook:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,129 Posts
I still would like to at least see a pre 42 model can. I have a hard time believing they didnt make any new chests till 42.

Nice can Steamer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,134 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I still would like to at least see a pre 42 model can. I have a hard time believing they didnt make any new chests till 42.

Nice can Steamer
There is an earlier (type 1) M1 water chest, like I said this a (series/type 2) can that was most common during early WWII years. The early (type 1) chests had no rim on the bottom of the can and would not sit flat because the drain plug protruded out of the bottom of the chest, that is why you usually see the type 1 chests prop up against the tripod. The third type of chest (M1A1) had a different cap and utilized a canvas handle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,129 Posts
You are referring to the WW1 chest. There was a model drawn up in 1936 as the M1 chest. It had the higher sides like the 1942 model you sold here but it retained the WW1 style closure with raised dome on top of can and the half circle cutout on the closure to indicate how to align the interrupted threads of the lid with the can. They changed the closure in 1942 with the larger bail handle and added the arrows for aligning the lid with the can. In reality the can you have here would technically be a type 2, version 2 can. I have been looking for evidence/an example of the 1936 pattern can but no luck yet. Seems odd they would not have started production of new cans until 1942
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,134 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You are referring to the WW1 chest. There was a model drawn up in 1936 as the M1 chest. It had the higher sides like the 1942 model you sold here but it retained the WW1 style closure with raised dome on top of can and the half circle cutout on the closure to indicate how to align the interrupted threads of the lid with the can. They changed the closure in 1942 with the larger bail handle and added the arrows for aligning the lid with the can. In reality the can you have here would technically be a type 2, version 2 can. I have been looking for evidence/an example of the 1936 pattern can but no luck yet. Seems odd they would not have started production of new cans until 1942
I understand what you are saying now. I appreciate your comments as I have learned something new as I was only aware of the three chests. Does not seem like they made many of the 1936 model, I would assume they just used the earlier WWI type chest until the beginning of WWII. I assume that coming out of the depression era the regular Army would only have a limited budget for new equipment and would have made do with WWI equipment that was only about 20 - 25 years old at the time. This would probably continue until 1940 when the US started ramping up manpower and equipment.
 

·
PhD in Over-Engineering
Joined
·
12,239 Posts
Thanks Guy's,

It was late for me ....

I thought I saw a small Stamped "BA" in the lower back,left hand side

Steamer:devillook:
Bad Steamer! Bad, bad Steamer!

:tongue:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,129 Posts
I understand what you are saying now. I appreciate your comments as I have learned something new as I was only aware of the three chests. Does not seem like they made many of the 1936 model, I would assume they just used the earlier WWI type chest until the beginning of WWII. I assume that coming out of the depression era the regular Army would only have a limited budget for new equipment and would have made do with WWI equipment that was only about 20 - 25 years old at the time. This would probably continue until 1940 when the US started ramping up manpower and equipment.
It would appear the WW1 chests stayed in service till the guns went out of service and were retired given away as foreign aid packages to include to RVN troops. A number of WW1 cans have the 1942 pattern closures on them (including the chest I have) I suspect but have no evidence aside from a conversation with Rick Shab about a pallet of WW1 chests he had acquired years ago that if he remembered correctly many had the 42 closures. This may be an indication that the Army may have issued 42 closures as upgrades to earlier chests still in service.

The 3 main complaints of the chest designs seem to be

1. Early models the bail handle could only fit three fingers to carry, filled with water it was unpleasant with combined weight of the can.

2. The earliest can had to be leaned or a hole dug out under the can for the spout to fit into. They must have dumped over often losing water and With the leather gaskets they must have dripped/leaked often everywhere. The 2nd gen cans were designed with the raised sides allowing it to be stood up and protection for the spout and closure while being carried, dropped, etc.

3. You had to close the cans to carry them, in a hurry shift of position this was a pain. The M1A1 chest with webbing strap addressed this issue.

Third gen cans had a metal plate in shape of a triangle as the closure retainer on brass plumbers chain. Each generation had its own style of retainer. The first 2 generations were brass wire looped that could be squeezed to fit into the can. I wonder how many times the cans came opened while running with them. With perhaps the brass retainer breaking, chain failure, water everywhere. Also the steel plate in the 3rd gen can if you pick up the can empty tends to ring the can like a cow bell.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,614 Posts
It would appear the WW1 chests stayed in service till the guns went out of service and were retired given away as foreign aid packages to include to RVN troops. A number of WW1 cans have the 1942 pattern closures on them (including the chest I have) I suspect but have no evidence aside from a conversation with Rick Shab about a pallet of WW1 chests he had acquired years ago that if he remembered correctly many had the 42 closures. This may be an indication that the Army may have issued 42 closures as upgrades to earlier chests still in service.
The 3 main complaints of the chest designs seem to be
1. Early models the bail handle could only fit three fingers to carry, filled with water it was unpleasant with combined weight of the can.
2. The earliest can had to be leaned or a hole dug out under the can for the spout to fit into. They must have dumped over often losing water and With the leather gaskets they must have dripped/leaked often everywhere. The 2nd gen cans were designed with the raised sides allowing it to be stood up and protection for the spout and closure while being carried, dropped, etc.
3. You had to close the cans to carry them, in a hurry shift of position this was a pain. The M1A1 chest with webbing strap addressed this issue.
Third gen cans had a metal plate in shape of a triangle as the closure retainer on brass plumbers chain. Each generation had its own style of retainer. The first 2 generations were brass wire looped that could be squeezed to fit into the can. I wonder how many times the cans came opened while running with them. With perhaps the brass retainer breaking, chain failure, water everywhere. Also the steel plate in the 3rd gen can if you pick up the can empty tends to ring the can like a cow bell.....
Way back in 1492, when I purchased my ersatz '28 Argie Colt, the seller sent it to me with a bunch of steam chests. I sold some, but kept three for my myself.

Sorry, but I posted the incorrect photos. Sorry about that. I will post the correct photos tomorrow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,129 Posts
Nice examples thanks for taking the time to illustrate what I was trying to describe. The 1936 pattern chest was suppossed to have the high walls of the M1 and M1A1 chests but had the WW1 1st generation closure (small handle) with half circle cutout and raised alignment dome. Still on the lookout for an actual example either in pictures or in a collection somewhere.

You can see the 3 different retainer styles in your pictures as well as the plumbers chain. You can still buy the correct style chain to replace if needed. I picked up some to repair mine and have had the intent to reproduce the correct retainer for my 1942 style closure. Jeff Prater was kind enough to make a 3rd generation retainer for mine but I would like it to have the correct style for the lid.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top