1919 A4 Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,030 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just turned these up in a box of my father's hunting stuff. I remember him using them when I was a kid. I think they may have been "liberated" by an uncle who served in Korea, but not really sure. They have no military markings that I can see so I'm skeptical of the Korea story.

Anyway, I know nothing about USGI optics. If someone here does and can identify what/where/when it would be a big help to me. They aren't for sale. I'm just curious.

IMG_0537.JPG IMG_0547.JPG IMG_0546.JPG IMG_0545.JPG IMG_0543.JPG IMG_0542.JPG IMG_0541.JPG IMG_0539.JPG IMG_0538.JPG IMG_0548.JPG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,355 Posts
I'm going to say these are military surplus. My father had a pair exactly like this, which he'd always identified as military surplus, that were passed on to me before he died.

Background: My father worked in a relatively high position for the Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) in Washington, D.C. in the early 1940's, when my parents married. He was in a fairly high position with lots of legal responsibility and was a responsible and honest person. My parents lived in the same rooming house in downtown DC before they were married, near the Capitol building, and after marrying moved about 3 miles "way out in the country," to Arlington. My older brother was born there, before Dad and the family temporarily moved to Philadelphia to open a new branch of the SEC. I was born in Philadelphia in '44, and we moved back to our Arlington home in about '46. Dad would come across gubbmint surplus sales due to his working for the gubbmint, and came across these (Navy?) "field glasses." I still have the manual Smith-Corona manual typewrite he purchased for $25 that way about 1950 -- a princely sum!

A co-worker, who the family visited frequently frequently was a wry "old" lady -- divorced, spoke some rough language once-in-awhile, liked the outdoors, camped, was a "bird watcher," and lived in downtown DC. She lived for traveling the world in search of a different bird she'd never spotted before. I loved her travel stories and loved her choices of records -- "The Fiesta Brava, Brother Dave Gardner, Bob & Ray," and some other downright risque stuff, as well as classical. (I played French Horn.) She loved kids and always tried to have some pumpernickel bread available when we came to visit because she knew I liked it as a treat, better than candy, cake or gum. She thought about other people, more than any other adult I'd even known. Up to this time I was about age 15.

As my parents got older and downsized, Dad mentioned to this lady, Cecil Mae Kilmer, he wanted to pass something of importance, as a memory, along to each of his three boys. Cecil May, the birdwatcher, and I'd traveled the East Coast of Florida ONE WINTER DAY and identified over 125 species of wild birds. This in an almost unreal number of spottings for one day, but that's another story. Cecil Mae suggested these MILITARY SURPLUS FIELD GLASSES, as Dad had obtained another higher-end pair of binoculars. His response was something to the effect of "Well, (he) didn't think Gary wouldn't appreciate something like that." Cecil Mae responded, "Well, hell Rodney, you don't know your son very well!" I got the glasses. They were stolen from the back of my VW bug while working at the Washington Hospital Center, about 1978., and I don't think I've ever mourned the loss of any material object more.

So, I'm gonna say, without reservation, "Yes, they are US military surplus," and you can see a little about time frame here.


Carry On!
Gary
><>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,117 Posts
American made British Issue. British broad arrow on left rear and British style carry case. Does it have the rangefinding lines inside? Korea story might have some truth. Koreans used whatever they could capture.

Met a woman who had a WW1 Navy Issue Model 1911 that her Dad took off a German Colonel in WW2 who had captured it in WW1. Man I did just about everything to get that gun realizing where it probably came from.


EDIT: I see the rangefinding lines. These are the same style issued to US troops (and machinegun crews) in WW2. I Have the US twin to this one, tucked into a British marked canvas carry case that I grabbed seperately for display
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,065 Posts
I dug out the pair of binoculars that i have from WWII era They are OD in color and are marked

"BINOCULAR M3 6X30" on the left side.

"NASH KELVINATOR CORP. 1943 H.M.R." , on the right side

They look somewhat like the ones in the picture but not quite the same.

At some point the original leather carrying case was replaced with a plastic one At the surplus sale that I got them from they had both cases but the leather ones were pretty beat up That was about 35 years ago.The Army then went to a new style binocular and we had them in the Army Reserve but I can't remember the model number.

Off topic. I also have a pair of "Binoculars -IR-M18".. These were infrared binoculars that used a single "C" cell battery. I believe they were issued to armored units.long before the starlight units were developed. You needed an IR source to make them work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,117 Posts
Thats pretty cool armorer. I have a pair of metascopes (IR attachments for the M60 tank scopes) I was able to test out the one and she runs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,117 Posts
Because the typical guy who decides they need to fix something doesnt have a clue what they are doing.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,030 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thank you GSG. The mind is a funny thing. Had I seen that broad arrow on a firearm my first thought would have been British or Canadian. On these I figured it meant "this side up". Duh.

I hear you Gary. Dad and I spent a lot of time in the hills chasing deer and elk with those binoculars slung around his neck. I'm a granddad now and I'm headed out tomorrow with son and grandson on a deer hunt, but I still miss him.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top